Title

Polydiacetylene-Based Smart Packaging

ACS Citation

Hill, S. C.; Htet, Y.; Kauffman, J.; Han, I. Y.; Dawson, P. L.; Pennington, W. T.; Hanks, T. W. Polydiacetylene-Based Smart Packaging. In Physical Methods in Food Analysis; Tunick, M. H., Onwulata, C. I., Eds.; ACS Symposium Series; American Chemical Society: Washington, DC, 2013; Vol. 1138, pp 137–154.

Abstract

Blends of polydiacetylenes (PDAs), such as 3- and 4-BCMU and PCDA in host polymers, Tecoflex? and polylactic acid were prepared and their potential applicability as active sensors in food packaging are described. A striking chromic transformation from deep blue to bright red, accompanied by a characteristic change in the Raman spectra of the PDAs occurs as a result of environmental stresses, such as heating, mechanical shear, exposure to solvents and other agents. Modification of the pendant groups of the PDA can expand the triggering stresses to include toxins, bacteria and other chemical and biological entities. Mechanical impact sensors and thermal and environmental history recorders have been prepared. The potential application of the polymer blends as photolithographic receptors has also been explored. Incorporation of the PDA sensing systems into textiles, such as calcium alginate and other materials allows the preparation of intelligent packaging, smart labels, and sanitation monitors for food processing, shipment, storage, and preparation. Blends of polydiacetylenes (PDAs), such as 3- and 4-BCMU and PCDA in host polymers, Tecoflex? and polylactic acid were prepared and their potential applicability as active sensors in food packaging are described. A striking chromic transformation from deep blue to bright red, accompanied by a characteristic change in the Raman spectra of the PDAs occurs as a result of environmental stresses, such as heating, mechanical shear, exposure to solvents and other agents. Modification of the pendant groups of the PDA can expand the triggering stresses to include toxins, bacteria and other chemical and biological entities. Mechanical impact sensors and thermal and environmental history recorders have been prepared. The potential application of the polymer blends as photolithographic receptors has also been explored. Incorporation of the PDA sensing systems into textiles, such as calcium alginate and other materials allows the preparation of intelligent packaging, smart labels, and sanitation monitors for food processing, shipment, storage, and preparation.

Source Name

Physical Methods in Food Analysis

Publication Date

2013

Volume

1138

Page(s)

137-154

Document Type

Citation

Citation Type

Book Chapter