Title

Synthesis and Cytotoxic Properties of Chalcones: An Interactive and Investigative Undergraduate Laboratory Project at the Interface of Chemistry and Biology

ACS Citation

Dickson, J.; Flores, L. V.; Stewart, M.; LeBlanc, R.; Pati, H. N.; Lee, M.; Holt, H. L., Jr. Synthesis and Cytotoxic Properties of Chalcones: An Interactive and Investigative Undergraduate Laboratory Project at the Interface of Chemistry and Biology. J. Chem. Educ. 2006, 83, 934-934.

Abstract

A highly integrated laboratory project that emphasizes techniques of chemistry and biology is described. Laboratory exercises of this nature are becoming increasingly important as interdisciplinary scientific research improves our ability to meet some of the grand challenges in chemistry laid out by the National Research Council in 2003. This project combines the synthesis of a small library of 30 appropriately substituted chalcones, the measurement of their cytotoxic properties, and the study of their structure?activity relationships using computational chemistry. In the synthesis portion of the sequence, students will learn basic organic laboratory techniques such as vacuum filtration, recrystallization, thin-layer chromatography (TLC), melting point determination, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and ultraviolet?visible (UV?vis) spectroscopy. For the biology component, the instructor should partner with a cell biologist to assist in conducting the experiments. The instructor should decide how involved the students would be in conducting the cytotoxicity studies. The molecular modeling aspect of this laboratory sequence will provide students with experience building molecules within the modeling program and optimizing the structure and conformation of the molecules using molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics. A highly integrated laboratory project that emphasizes techniques of chemistry and biology is described. Laboratory exercises of this nature are becoming increasingly important as interdisciplinary scientific research improves our ability to meet some of the grand challenges in chemistry laid out by the National Research Council in 2003. This project combines the synthesis of a small library of 30 appropriately substituted chalcones, the measurement of their cytotoxic properties, and the study of their structure?activity relationships using computational chemistry. In the synthesis portion of the sequence, students will learn basic organic laboratory techniques such as vacuum filtration, recrystallization, thin-layer chromatography (TLC), melting point determination, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and ultraviolet?visible (UV?vis) spectroscopy. For the biology component, the instructor should partner with a cell biologist to assist in conducting the experiments. The instructor should decide how involved the students would be in conducting the cytotoxicity studies. The molecular modeling aspect of this laboratory sequence will provide students with experience building molecules within the modeling program and optimizing the structure and conformation of the molecules using molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics.

Source Name

Journal of Chemical Education

Publication Date

1-1-2006

Volume

83

Issue

6

Page(s)

271-271

Document Type

Citation

Citation Type

Article