The Efficacy of Home Remedies, Citric Acid and Tea Tree Oil, on the Inhibition of Staphylococcus epidermidis in Relation to Facial Acne

Ann McKenna Savoca

Abstract

Millions upon millions of people are infected with a skin disease called acne vulgaris, and one of the major bacterias stemming from this disease is called Staphylococcus epidermidis. In this experiment, the efficacy of two different home remedies, lemon juice and tea tree oil, is tested on the bacteria Staphylococcus epidermidis. It is hypothesized that the growth of S. epidermidis will be inhibited by a small degree by the lemon juice and by a larger degree by the tea tree Oil. The null hypothesis is that the citric acid and tea tree oil will have no affect on the inhibition of S. epidermidis. The inhibition of the bacteria is the dependent variable, while the independent variables are 100% lemon juice, 50% lemon juice, 100% tea tree oil, and water. After letting the S. epidermidis grow for several days, the bacteria is transferred onto 9 plates. In order to measure inhibition, the agar disc diffusion method is used on all 9 plates, and each independent variable has 3 plates each. The zones of inhibition around each disc are measured to the nearest millimeter, and the data was then imported into an Excel spreadsheet where statistical analysis was conducted. Data suggests that tea tree oil is statistically significant as a solution that can effectively inhibit the growth of S. epidermidis because the P-value is significantly greater than 0.05 and the F is greater than the F critical . The data collected for 50% lemon juice and 100% lemon juice suggests that both have a minimal effect on the inhibition of S. epidermidis because the P-value was greater than 0.05. Therefore, the hypothesis, the growth of S. epidermidis will be inhibited by a small degree by the 50% lemon juice and 100% lemon juice and by a larger degree by the tea tree oil, failed to be rejected.

 
Apr 11th, 12:00 AM Apr 11th, 12:00 AM

The Efficacy of Home Remedies, Citric Acid and Tea Tree Oil, on the Inhibition of Staphylococcus epidermidis in Relation to Facial Acne

Millions upon millions of people are infected with a skin disease called acne vulgaris, and one of the major bacterias stemming from this disease is called Staphylococcus epidermidis. In this experiment, the efficacy of two different home remedies, lemon juice and tea tree oil, is tested on the bacteria Staphylococcus epidermidis. It is hypothesized that the growth of S. epidermidis will be inhibited by a small degree by the lemon juice and by a larger degree by the tea tree Oil. The null hypothesis is that the citric acid and tea tree oil will have no affect on the inhibition of S. epidermidis. The inhibition of the bacteria is the dependent variable, while the independent variables are 100% lemon juice, 50% lemon juice, 100% tea tree oil, and water. After letting the S. epidermidis grow for several days, the bacteria is transferred onto 9 plates. In order to measure inhibition, the agar disc diffusion method is used on all 9 plates, and each independent variable has 3 plates each. The zones of inhibition around each disc are measured to the nearest millimeter, and the data was then imported into an Excel spreadsheet where statistical analysis was conducted. Data suggests that tea tree oil is statistically significant as a solution that can effectively inhibit the growth of S. epidermidis because the P-value is significantly greater than 0.05 and the F is greater than the F critical . The data collected for 50% lemon juice and 100% lemon juice suggests that both have a minimal effect on the inhibition of S. epidermidis because the P-value was greater than 0.05. Therefore, the hypothesis, the growth of S. epidermidis will be inhibited by a small degree by the 50% lemon juice and 100% lemon juice and by a larger degree by the tea tree oil, failed to be rejected.