Title

Using Hydrothermal Carbonization Reactors To Remove E. Coli From Livestock Products

Author(s)

Jessica Collins

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science and Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Environmental Science

Presentation Type

Mentored

Mentor

Mentor: Thomas F. Ducey, Coastal Plain Soil, Water and Plant Conservation Research, United States Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service

Abstract

Scientists have been researching new methods that are eco-friendly and least costly when debating the topic of eliminating the spread of pathogen and antibiotic resistance in the environment. Prior research of this field has been rarely studied until the introduction of Hydrothermal Carbonization (HTC) Reactions which emit carbon-rich hydrochar. These reactors were used to test the elimination of the E. coli O157:H7 from infected cow bone and muscle tissue at different temperatures and time. Kanamycin, an antibiotic resistance drug containing the E. coli plasmid, has been known to have an increased resistance with bacteria used agriculturally. Because of this, Kanamycin was used in the agar plates in order to track the growth or lack of growth with the experimental E. coli. The leftover liquid from the reactor was serial diluted to test for growth in bacterial colonies. DNA extractions were taken on the different samples and ran on electrophoresis gels after undergoing PCR reactions. Detection of the E. coli plasmid was negative for 200° bone and muscle tissue samples and 150° meat samples but was positive in the first well of the 150° meat sample. Essentially, the HTC Reactors were essential in eliminating the bacteria which now lead into investigating which HTC reactor would be ideal for farmers to use in the future for livestock disposal.

Start Date

4-11-2015 10:45 AM

End Date

4-11-2015 11:00 AM

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 10:45 AM Apr 11th, 11:00 AM

Using Hydrothermal Carbonization Reactors To Remove E. Coli From Livestock Products

Scientists have been researching new methods that are eco-friendly and least costly when debating the topic of eliminating the spread of pathogen and antibiotic resistance in the environment. Prior research of this field has been rarely studied until the introduction of Hydrothermal Carbonization (HTC) Reactions which emit carbon-rich hydrochar. These reactors were used to test the elimination of the E. coli O157:H7 from infected cow bone and muscle tissue at different temperatures and time. Kanamycin, an antibiotic resistance drug containing the E. coli plasmid, has been known to have an increased resistance with bacteria used agriculturally. Because of this, Kanamycin was used in the agar plates in order to track the growth or lack of growth with the experimental E. coli. The leftover liquid from the reactor was serial diluted to test for growth in bacterial colonies. DNA extractions were taken on the different samples and ran on electrophoresis gels after undergoing PCR reactions. Detection of the E. coli plasmid was negative for 200° bone and muscle tissue samples and 150° meat samples but was positive in the first well of the 150° meat sample. Essentially, the HTC Reactors were essential in eliminating the bacteria which now lead into investigating which HTC reactor would be ideal for farmers to use in the future for livestock disposal.