Title

Warming And Elevated Carbon Dioxide Increases Suberin Content In The Roots Of A C4 Grass Species

Author(s)

Kendall Koon

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science and Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Botany

Presentation Type

Mentored

Mentor

Mentor: Vidya Suseela, School of Agricultural, Forest, and Environmental Sciences, Clemson University

Abstract

Because of the global increase in greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide levels are rising and causing a change in the root chemistry of many plant species. Through the PHACE experiment, which tested the effects of increased Carbon Dioxide and temperature on two species of grasses, we gathered the root samples that were later tested for several suberin monomers. Because of their adaptability to environments with low carbon dioxide and temperature level, we assumed that the Bouteloua gracilis species that we studied would only have a small increase in its suberin content. C4 species can intake carbon dioxide at a higher rate than C3 species so having an increase in carbon dioxide would have a relatively small effect on these plants. To test this hypothesis we completed a base hydrolysis of the root samples and then analyzed them using Gas Chromatography/ Mass Spectrometry. Using Two Way ANOVA statistical analysis we found that carbon dioxide and warming played a significant role in the overall increase of suberin, aromatics, and ω-hydroxy acid concentrations in the C4 species. This increase may be related to morphological changes causing roots to become longer and thinner. As the increase in temperature and carbon dioxide levels continue plants are likely to store more carbon in the soil.

Start Date

4-11-2015 9:45 AM

End Date

4-11-2015 10:00 AM

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 9:45 AM Apr 11th, 10:00 AM

Warming And Elevated Carbon Dioxide Increases Suberin Content In The Roots Of A C4 Grass Species

Because of the global increase in greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide levels are rising and causing a change in the root chemistry of many plant species. Through the PHACE experiment, which tested the effects of increased Carbon Dioxide and temperature on two species of grasses, we gathered the root samples that were later tested for several suberin monomers. Because of their adaptability to environments with low carbon dioxide and temperature level, we assumed that the Bouteloua gracilis species that we studied would only have a small increase in its suberin content. C4 species can intake carbon dioxide at a higher rate than C3 species so having an increase in carbon dioxide would have a relatively small effect on these plants. To test this hypothesis we completed a base hydrolysis of the root samples and then analyzed them using Gas Chromatography/ Mass Spectrometry. Using Two Way ANOVA statistical analysis we found that carbon dioxide and warming played a significant role in the overall increase of suberin, aromatics, and ω-hydroxy acid concentrations in the C4 species. This increase may be related to morphological changes causing roots to become longer and thinner. As the increase in temperature and carbon dioxide levels continue plants are likely to store more carbon in the soil.