Title

Examination of the Flow of Acetaminophen

Author(s)

Farris Sabir

School Name

Southside High School

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Biochemistry

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

A substance’s flow is determined by the characteristics of the substance in motion and the material through which it travels. Overall, the conditions of certain parts of the human body create a diverse environment for the flow of pharmaceutical substances, from the distance at which the body part is located with respect to the ground and the pressure of the fluids through which the flow must occur through. In fact, according to Bernoulli’s equation, flow velocity shares a directly proportional relationship with pressure and height. This experiment, which utilizes acetaminophen in particular, simulates this environment by allowing velocity and height to be manipulated to measure the diffusion of acetaminophen. Although we are not measuring pressure exactly, this variable affects the change in the concentration of the substance as to most effectively simulate the dispersal of acetaminophen across a digestive tract. We theorize that velocity will be directly associated with the rate of diffusion of acetaminophen to a certain extent, as there is a distinct shift between laminar and turbulent flow with a certain change in velocity. By changing the orientation of height of flow, we may also create this turbulent flow and therefore, disrupt the diffusion of the substance.

Start Date

4-11-2015 8:45 AM

End Date

4-11-2015 9:00 AM

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 8:45 AM Apr 11th, 9:00 AM

Examination of the Flow of Acetaminophen

A substance’s flow is determined by the characteristics of the substance in motion and the material through which it travels. Overall, the conditions of certain parts of the human body create a diverse environment for the flow of pharmaceutical substances, from the distance at which the body part is located with respect to the ground and the pressure of the fluids through which the flow must occur through. In fact, according to Bernoulli’s equation, flow velocity shares a directly proportional relationship with pressure and height. This experiment, which utilizes acetaminophen in particular, simulates this environment by allowing velocity and height to be manipulated to measure the diffusion of acetaminophen. Although we are not measuring pressure exactly, this variable affects the change in the concentration of the substance as to most effectively simulate the dispersal of acetaminophen across a digestive tract. We theorize that velocity will be directly associated with the rate of diffusion of acetaminophen to a certain extent, as there is a distinct shift between laminar and turbulent flow with a certain change in velocity. By changing the orientation of height of flow, we may also create this turbulent flow and therefore, disrupt the diffusion of the substance.