The Effect of Water Color on The Thermal Capacity of a Solar Heat Capturing Device

Payton Tyler Phillips

Abstract

The purpose of this research project was to analyze the effectiveness of yellow, black, blue, and colorless water colors as thermal storage materials in a solar heating device; to explore the possibility of supplying inexpensive heat to a room during the winter. Tests were conducted to determine which color would store the most thermal energy and release the most energy as heat. The device was designed to be placed against a window, which allowed the materials to capture the sun's energy as heat during the day. The device consisted of four separate twelve by twelve inch boxes and was surrounded with insulation except for the window side. Fans on the back of the device pushed air through each box continuously. A temperature probe was placed in front of each intake and output opening exiting into the 1 room. The purpose of this design was to allow measurement and comparison of the input and output air temperature. The temperature was measured every twelve minutes for four days. Data were averaged and analyzed using a one-way ANOVA test(=0.05). The mean of the change in temperature (oC) for the control was 1.25, black 1.41, blue 0.68, and yellow 0.78. The results showed black water had the greatest change of temperature every twelve minutes, and held the heat energy the longest during the time when it was not exposed to sunlight. This experiment provides validation of an inexpensive solar heat capturing device and tested water colors that can provide an efficient way to heat a room finding black water to be the most efficient.

 
Apr 11th, 12:00 AM Apr 11th, 12:00 AM

The Effect of Water Color on The Thermal Capacity of a Solar Heat Capturing Device

The purpose of this research project was to analyze the effectiveness of yellow, black, blue, and colorless water colors as thermal storage materials in a solar heating device; to explore the possibility of supplying inexpensive heat to a room during the winter. Tests were conducted to determine which color would store the most thermal energy and release the most energy as heat. The device was designed to be placed against a window, which allowed the materials to capture the sun's energy as heat during the day. The device consisted of four separate twelve by twelve inch boxes and was surrounded with insulation except for the window side. Fans on the back of the device pushed air through each box continuously. A temperature probe was placed in front of each intake and output opening exiting into the 1 room. The purpose of this design was to allow measurement and comparison of the input and output air temperature. The temperature was measured every twelve minutes for four days. Data were averaged and analyzed using a one-way ANOVA test(=0.05). The mean of the change in temperature (oC) for the control was 1.25, black 1.41, blue 0.68, and yellow 0.78. The results showed black water had the greatest change of temperature every twelve minutes, and held the heat energy the longest during the time when it was not exposed to sunlight. This experiment provides validation of an inexpensive solar heat capturing device and tested water colors that can provide an efficient way to heat a room finding black water to be the most efficient.