Title

Are Anti-Anxiety Medications Worth Their Benefits?

Author(s)

Julia Long

School Name

The Center for Advanced Technical Studies

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Psychology and Sociology

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

The research dealt with anti-anxiety medication and whether or not they are worth taking based off of typical side effects experienced by the average patient. It was hypothesized that the medication is not worth taking. Data was compiled by sifting through redacted medical records of patients with anxiety disorders from 1960 to present day. It was expected that the medications are not worth taking and that the majority of patients with an anxiety disorder experience at least three side effects, no matter which medication they take. Data was analyzed by categorizing the patients based off of individual factors, compiled through percentages within those groups and then compared. It was hoped that, should the medication be found unworthy of prescription, psychiatrists will only prescribe the medication in more extreme cases of anxiety in his or her patients. Hopefully the project will serve as a foundation for future work on alternative solutions to anxiety relief for people with true disorders. As a second component, the experimenter used mice to study the side effects of the anti-anxiety medications versus the effects of powdered chamomile, which has been shown to alleviate symptoms of Generalized Anxiety Disorder. It was hoped that the chamomile would provide a safer alternative to the medication while also remaining effective.

Start Date

4-11-2015 9:45 AM

End Date

4-11-2015 10:00 AM

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 9:45 AM Apr 11th, 10:00 AM

Are Anti-Anxiety Medications Worth Their Benefits?

The research dealt with anti-anxiety medication and whether or not they are worth taking based off of typical side effects experienced by the average patient. It was hypothesized that the medication is not worth taking. Data was compiled by sifting through redacted medical records of patients with anxiety disorders from 1960 to present day. It was expected that the medications are not worth taking and that the majority of patients with an anxiety disorder experience at least three side effects, no matter which medication they take. Data was analyzed by categorizing the patients based off of individual factors, compiled through percentages within those groups and then compared. It was hoped that, should the medication be found unworthy of prescription, psychiatrists will only prescribe the medication in more extreme cases of anxiety in his or her patients. Hopefully the project will serve as a foundation for future work on alternative solutions to anxiety relief for people with true disorders. As a second component, the experimenter used mice to study the side effects of the anti-anxiety medications versus the effects of powdered chamomile, which has been shown to alleviate symptoms of Generalized Anxiety Disorder. It was hoped that the chamomile would provide a safer alternative to the medication while also remaining effective.