Title

Development and performance evaluation of a photovoltaic trekking pole

Author(s)

Jenning N. Chen

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Engineering

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Oral Presentation Award

1st Place

Written Paper Award

1st Place

Abstract

In today’s society, the demand for renewable energy is higher than ever. Various innovations utilizing solar, wind, and water power have been proposed to harness the energy provided by these natural sources. In the study, a design for a photovoltaic trekking pole was proposed, and its viability was tested. It was hypothesized that enough energy needed to power an iPhone 5 for 20 minutes of talk time (0.227 Wh) would be harvested under clear and mostly sunny conditions. This hypothesis was tested by first constructing the design and maximizing the power output through maximum power point tracking. The pole was then placed outside for each trial, which lasted from 9 am to 4 pm. The harvested energy was subsequently recorded by draining the battery. The means, from lowest to highest, were those of overcast, mostly cloudy, mostly sunny, and sunny conditions, respectively. Clear and mostly sunny conditions yielded more than the required 0.227 Wh, thus supporting the hypothesis. The data were statistically analyzed at alpha equal to 0.05 with a repeat measure ANOVA, which concluded that a significant difference existed between the means; F(3,51)=2.786, p<0.05. The consequent Scheffé test determined that significant differences existed between all pairwise comparisons of weather conditions. This, along with analysis of the mean connect line, effectively concluded that weather condition was found to have a linear and most direct impact on the amount of energy harvested.

Start Date

4-11-2015 10:00 AM

End Date

4-11-2015 10:15 AM

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 10:00 AM Apr 11th, 10:15 AM

Development and performance evaluation of a photovoltaic trekking pole

In today’s society, the demand for renewable energy is higher than ever. Various innovations utilizing solar, wind, and water power have been proposed to harness the energy provided by these natural sources. In the study, a design for a photovoltaic trekking pole was proposed, and its viability was tested. It was hypothesized that enough energy needed to power an iPhone 5 for 20 minutes of talk time (0.227 Wh) would be harvested under clear and mostly sunny conditions. This hypothesis was tested by first constructing the design and maximizing the power output through maximum power point tracking. The pole was then placed outside for each trial, which lasted from 9 am to 4 pm. The harvested energy was subsequently recorded by draining the battery. The means, from lowest to highest, were those of overcast, mostly cloudy, mostly sunny, and sunny conditions, respectively. Clear and mostly sunny conditions yielded more than the required 0.227 Wh, thus supporting the hypothesis. The data were statistically analyzed at alpha equal to 0.05 with a repeat measure ANOVA, which concluded that a significant difference existed between the means; F(3,51)=2.786, p<0.05. The consequent Scheffé test determined that significant differences existed between all pairwise comparisons of weather conditions. This, along with analysis of the mean connect line, effectively concluded that weather condition was found to have a linear and most direct impact on the amount of energy harvested.