Title

Bio-Compatible Hydrogels For Continuous Glucose Monitors

Author(s)

Gordon Zhang

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science and Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Engineering

Presentation Type

Mentored

Mentor

Mentor: Qian Wang, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina

Oral Presentation Award

2nd Place

Abstract

The Wang Group Lab in the Chemical Engineering Department of the University of South Carolina has developed an effective continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) device utilizing a bio-compatible hydrogel to detect glucose concentration in diabetic patients. The purpose of this experiment was to synthesize a gel with high stability (that is, not prone to decomposition), high porosity (allows sugar to pass through quickly and not collect), and high selectivity (reacts only with glucose, not other sugars) for use in a commercially viable CGM. We created gels with discrete ratios of key components and tested their properties using a rheometer. Through these experiments, we found an optimized recipe that exhibits the properties of stability, porosity, and selectivity. This recipe, in combination with the Wang group’s CGM, may prove useful to diabetic patients seeking a faster, more accurate, and more convenient alternative to current blood-prick monitors

Start Date

4-11-2015 9:30 AM

End Date

4-11-2015 9:45 AM

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 9:30 AM Apr 11th, 9:45 AM

Bio-Compatible Hydrogels For Continuous Glucose Monitors

The Wang Group Lab in the Chemical Engineering Department of the University of South Carolina has developed an effective continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) device utilizing a bio-compatible hydrogel to detect glucose concentration in diabetic patients. The purpose of this experiment was to synthesize a gel with high stability (that is, not prone to decomposition), high porosity (allows sugar to pass through quickly and not collect), and high selectivity (reacts only with glucose, not other sugars) for use in a commercially viable CGM. We created gels with discrete ratios of key components and tested their properties using a rheometer. Through these experiments, we found an optimized recipe that exhibits the properties of stability, porosity, and selectivity. This recipe, in combination with the Wang group’s CGM, may prove useful to diabetic patients seeking a faster, more accurate, and more convenient alternative to current blood-prick monitors