Title

The Effect of a Filter Made Using Quercus laurifolia on the Bacterial Colony Count in Lake Water

Author(s)

Tylar D. Watson

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Environmental Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

The quality of human health and survival is largely based on accessibility to safe drinking water and basic water sanitation. Many populations, globally however, do not have access to clean water. Particularly, populations in undeveloped nations often experience significant challenges in obtaining potable water. In other cases people may be forced to go without clean water, including being stranded in the woods or forest. A solution to this was considered by testing the effect of a filter made of epoxy putty, PVC tubing, and a Quercus laurifolia branch, a type of tree more commonly known as laurel oak. The process included running 1.5 milliliters of water through the Quercus laurifolia filter 30 times and preparing five Petri dishes by plating, incubating, and counting the resulting bacterial colonies. As a control, unfiltered water was plated on four Petri dishes, incubated, and counted. The average number of colonies for filtered water samples was 1369, while the unfiltered water samples resulted in 64.5 colonies. It was hypothesized that there would be less bacterial colonies in the filtered water, compared to the unfiltered water. In a two sample t-test (t(4)=3.87, p=0.9910), there was insufficient evidence to support a statistical difference between the number of bacterial colonies that grew in filtered vs. unfiltered lake water, therefore not supporting the hypothesis. Instead, fewer bacterial colonies were found in the unfiltered water than the filtered water.

Start Date

4-11-2015 11:45 AM

End Date

4-11-2015 12:00 PM

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 11:45 AM Apr 11th, 12:00 PM

The Effect of a Filter Made Using Quercus laurifolia on the Bacterial Colony Count in Lake Water

The quality of human health and survival is largely based on accessibility to safe drinking water and basic water sanitation. Many populations, globally however, do not have access to clean water. Particularly, populations in undeveloped nations often experience significant challenges in obtaining potable water. In other cases people may be forced to go without clean water, including being stranded in the woods or forest. A solution to this was considered by testing the effect of a filter made of epoxy putty, PVC tubing, and a Quercus laurifolia branch, a type of tree more commonly known as laurel oak. The process included running 1.5 milliliters of water through the Quercus laurifolia filter 30 times and preparing five Petri dishes by plating, incubating, and counting the resulting bacterial colonies. As a control, unfiltered water was plated on four Petri dishes, incubated, and counted. The average number of colonies for filtered water samples was 1369, while the unfiltered water samples resulted in 64.5 colonies. It was hypothesized that there would be less bacterial colonies in the filtered water, compared to the unfiltered water. In a two sample t-test (t(4)=3.87, p=0.9910), there was insufficient evidence to support a statistical difference between the number of bacterial colonies that grew in filtered vs. unfiltered lake water, therefore not supporting the hypothesis. Instead, fewer bacterial colonies were found in the unfiltered water than the filtered water.