Title

The Effect of Different Nutrients Levels in Soil on the Oxygen Production Rate of Wisconsin Fast Plants (Brassica Rapa)

School Name

Heathwood Hall Episcopal School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Botany

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

This study investigated the effect of nutrients levels in soils, and their effect on the oxygenation rate of the Wisconsin Fast Plants grown in the different soils. The independent variable in this experiment is the five different types of soil used, and the dependent variable is the oxygen level produced by the Wisconsin Fast Plants. This study is beneficial, because while growing plants one can use the soil that allows plants to produce the most oxygen to help the environment. The motivation for this project came from hearing a USC Honor student talk about her work on a similar topic. The problem that was being studied was whether the nutrients levels in soil, in particular nitrogen, affect the oxygenation rate of the plants grown in them. In order to make progress in discovering the answer to our problem, seeds were planted in five different soils: Heathwood’s greenhouse soil, Black Kow soil, Miracle-Gro Garden soil, Miracle-Gro Potting Mix, and Scotts’ Topsoil. The oxygenation rate of the plants was measured every five days, for three trials. The hypothesis was, if plants are grown in soil with a higher nitrogen content, then they will produce more oxygen. The null hypothesis was that the oxygenation rate of the plants would not vary based on the soil they were grown in, and this was accepted. The results indicated that the soil with the highest nitrogen percentage did not produced the highest oxygenation rate.

Start Date

4-11-2015 1:45 PM

End Date

4-11-2015 2:00 PM

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 1:45 PM Apr 11th, 2:00 PM

The Effect of Different Nutrients Levels in Soil on the Oxygen Production Rate of Wisconsin Fast Plants (Brassica Rapa)

This study investigated the effect of nutrients levels in soils, and their effect on the oxygenation rate of the Wisconsin Fast Plants grown in the different soils. The independent variable in this experiment is the five different types of soil used, and the dependent variable is the oxygen level produced by the Wisconsin Fast Plants. This study is beneficial, because while growing plants one can use the soil that allows plants to produce the most oxygen to help the environment. The motivation for this project came from hearing a USC Honor student talk about her work on a similar topic. The problem that was being studied was whether the nutrients levels in soil, in particular nitrogen, affect the oxygenation rate of the plants grown in them. In order to make progress in discovering the answer to our problem, seeds were planted in five different soils: Heathwood’s greenhouse soil, Black Kow soil, Miracle-Gro Garden soil, Miracle-Gro Potting Mix, and Scotts’ Topsoil. The oxygenation rate of the plants was measured every five days, for three trials. The hypothesis was, if plants are grown in soil with a higher nitrogen content, then they will produce more oxygen. The null hypothesis was that the oxygenation rate of the plants would not vary based on the soil they were grown in, and this was accepted. The results indicated that the soil with the highest nitrogen percentage did not produced the highest oxygenation rate.