Title

The Effect of Different Protein Ratios on the Weight Gain of Bos taurus

Author(s)

Andres D. Pineda

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Zoology

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Written Paper Award

1st Place

Abstract

Beef production significantly affects the U.S. economy. According to USDA, producers of meat animals, such as cattle, were responsible for more than $66 billion in added value to the U.S. economy during 2008. The purpose of the project is to find a safe and efficient process to increase the weight gain of cattle by feeding them different ratios of protein. In order to measure the effect of the protein content, the cattle will be ran down a chute and onto a scale, which would measure in pounds. It is hypothesized that if the heifers are given 14% protein feed, 37% protein feed, and just allowed to graze, the group that is fed the 37% of protein feed will result in the most weight gain. The data collected for this experiment were statistically analyzed with the use of a One-Way ANOVA test, showing that the variance in protein content were statistically different compared to the control group, rejecting the null hypothesis F(2,27) = 30.74; p

Start Date

4-11-2015 10:30 AM

End Date

4-11-2015 10:45 AM

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 10:30 AM Apr 11th, 10:45 AM

The Effect of Different Protein Ratios on the Weight Gain of Bos taurus

Beef production significantly affects the U.S. economy. According to USDA, producers of meat animals, such as cattle, were responsible for more than $66 billion in added value to the U.S. economy during 2008. The purpose of the project is to find a safe and efficient process to increase the weight gain of cattle by feeding them different ratios of protein. In order to measure the effect of the protein content, the cattle will be ran down a chute and onto a scale, which would measure in pounds. It is hypothesized that if the heifers are given 14% protein feed, 37% protein feed, and just allowed to graze, the group that is fed the 37% of protein feed will result in the most weight gain. The data collected for this experiment were statistically analyzed with the use of a One-Way ANOVA test, showing that the variance in protein content were statistically different compared to the control group, rejecting the null hypothesis F(2,27) = 30.74; p