The Effect of Gender and Genre on Word Usage as Measured by Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count

Mary Wilgis

Abstract

In this experiment, the effect of gender and genre on word usage, as measured by Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC), was observed. This information would be beneficial to society because it helps understand the intersection between gender and communication as well as how the artistic minded versus the science minded convey meaning, It was hypothesized that will be a statistically difference in word usage in males and females, as well as in art and science categories, as measured by LIWC, in TED talks.The Null Hypothesis is that there will be no statistical difference in word usage in males and females, as well as in art and science categories, as measured by LIWC, in TED talks. This was accomplished by analyzing 100 randomly selected scripts from live TED talks. These scripts were then entered into the LIWC word analysis program where each word was compared to an online dictionary and put into one or more categories. This data was then imported into excel where statistical analysis was conducted. This statistical analysis revealed that there was no statistically significant difference between the word usage of males and females and the word usage of science and art, or any of these categories compared to the control group. This was determined because the P-Value was greater than .05 for all of the sets of data. Therefore, the null hypothesis failed to be rejected.

 
Apr 11th, 12:00 AM Apr 11th, 12:00 AM

The Effect of Gender and Genre on Word Usage as Measured by Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count

In this experiment, the effect of gender and genre on word usage, as measured by Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC), was observed. This information would be beneficial to society because it helps understand the intersection between gender and communication as well as how the artistic minded versus the science minded convey meaning, It was hypothesized that will be a statistically difference in word usage in males and females, as well as in art and science categories, as measured by LIWC, in TED talks.The Null Hypothesis is that there will be no statistical difference in word usage in males and females, as well as in art and science categories, as measured by LIWC, in TED talks. This was accomplished by analyzing 100 randomly selected scripts from live TED talks. These scripts were then entered into the LIWC word analysis program where each word was compared to an online dictionary and put into one or more categories. This data was then imported into excel where statistical analysis was conducted. This statistical analysis revealed that there was no statistically significant difference between the word usage of males and females and the word usage of science and art, or any of these categories compared to the control group. This was determined because the P-Value was greater than .05 for all of the sets of data. Therefore, the null hypothesis failed to be rejected.