Title

The effect of gymnosperm, Pinus taeda, and angiosperm, Lagerstroemia., on the absorbance of food coloring particles

Author(s)

Azalfa Lateef

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Environmental Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

In many places of the world, there is a shortage of clean water supply for people to drink. There are many detrimental effects if one does not have access to a clean water supply a bacterial illness. Xylem filters, which are cost efficient filters, are proposed to combat the water supply problems in countries where filters are not readily sold, or are not affordable. It was hypothesized that the gymnosperm Pinus taeda, will be a better filter than the Lagerstroemia. In order to test this, red food coloring was amalgamated with distilled water and then the absorbance was analyzed by using a Spectro Vis. Then the solution was poured through the xylem filters. The absorbance was analyzed afterwards. The ANOVA and Tukey test were conducted and the results yielded that all the variables were significantly different, F(3,34)= 436.18, p<0.001. The null hypothesis was rejected because the p-value was less than alpha which was 0.05. With this study, it has been proven that angiosperms will not filter more than gymnosperms due to the size of their pores and just the anatomy of their branches. In conclusion, while the Pinus taeda filtered the food coloring particles more efficiently, it can not be used as a commercial filters in developing countries due to the fact that it does not filter particle size lower than about 30~40 nms.

Start Date

4-11-2015 11:00 AM

End Date

4-11-2015 11:15 AM

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 11:00 AM Apr 11th, 11:15 AM

The effect of gymnosperm, Pinus taeda, and angiosperm, Lagerstroemia., on the absorbance of food coloring particles

In many places of the world, there is a shortage of clean water supply for people to drink. There are many detrimental effects if one does not have access to a clean water supply a bacterial illness. Xylem filters, which are cost efficient filters, are proposed to combat the water supply problems in countries where filters are not readily sold, or are not affordable. It was hypothesized that the gymnosperm Pinus taeda, will be a better filter than the Lagerstroemia. In order to test this, red food coloring was amalgamated with distilled water and then the absorbance was analyzed by using a Spectro Vis. Then the solution was poured through the xylem filters. The absorbance was analyzed afterwards. The ANOVA and Tukey test were conducted and the results yielded that all the variables were significantly different, F(3,34)= 436.18, p<0.001. The null hypothesis was rejected because the p-value was less than alpha which was 0.05. With this study, it has been proven that angiosperms will not filter more than gymnosperms due to the size of their pores and just the anatomy of their branches. In conclusion, while the Pinus taeda filtered the food coloring particles more efficiently, it can not be used as a commercial filters in developing countries due to the fact that it does not filter particle size lower than about 30~40 nms.