Title

The effect of nationality and media on knowledge, evaluation, and framing of the Russian Crimean annexation

Author(s)

Michael A. Spicer

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Psychology and Sociology

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

This paper explores the effect of nationality and media awareness on political attitudes toward the 2014 Russian annexation of the Crimea, a region that previously belonged to the Ukraine. 20 Russian respondents and 22 American respondents were interviewed to develop measures that captures each respondents’ level of knowledge about the Crimean annexation, their positive or negative evaluation of the annexation, and the type of language that they use to frame the reasons for the Annexation. Two-sample t-tests between nationality and knowledge (t(35)=4.18, p = <0.001), nationality and framing (t(24)=3.68, p = 0.001), nationality and evaluation (t(27)=2.41, p = <0.001), all show a significant difference. The findings support the hypothesis that a respondent’s nationality strongly influences what he or she believes about the Crimean annexation. Another two-sample t-test showed a significant difference in knowledge between high and low media aware individuals as well (t(40)=-2.60, p=0.023). Differences in media awareness turned out to be a significant indicator of a respondent’s political beliefs.

Start Date

4-11-2015 9:30 AM

End Date

4-11-2015 9:45 AM

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 9:30 AM Apr 11th, 9:45 AM

The effect of nationality and media on knowledge, evaluation, and framing of the Russian Crimean annexation

This paper explores the effect of nationality and media awareness on political attitudes toward the 2014 Russian annexation of the Crimea, a region that previously belonged to the Ukraine. 20 Russian respondents and 22 American respondents were interviewed to develop measures that captures each respondents’ level of knowledge about the Crimean annexation, their positive or negative evaluation of the annexation, and the type of language that they use to frame the reasons for the Annexation. Two-sample t-tests between nationality and knowledge (t(35)=4.18, p = <0.001), nationality and framing (t(24)=3.68, p = 0.001), nationality and evaluation (t(27)=2.41, p = <0.001), all show a significant difference. The findings support the hypothesis that a respondent’s nationality strongly influences what he or she believes about the Crimean annexation. Another two-sample t-test showed a significant difference in knowledge between high and low media aware individuals as well (t(40)=-2.60, p=0.023). Differences in media awareness turned out to be a significant indicator of a respondent’s political beliefs.