Title

The effect of various heating and cooling methods on the output voltage of a Peltier tile

Author(s)

Breanna B. Murrin

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Engineering

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Thermoelectricity is believed to be a potential alternative energy source. The purpose of this project was to test the practicability of the Peltier tile and observe how powering methods compare to one another. It was hypothesized that if six combinations of heat sources and cold sources were applied to a Peltier tile and three individual methods involving only the heat sources were applied to a Peltier tile, then the combination of hot water and heat sink would create the most output voltage. Heating methods included candle flame, hot water, and sunlight. Cooling methods included cold water and a heat sink. For this study, a Peltier tile was circuited with the voltmeter. The maximum voltage for each trial was measured after each method was applied to the Peltier tile. Data were statistically analyzed at alpha equal to 0.05 with an ANOVA [F(8,216)=344.991, p=<0.001] and a follow-up Scheffe test. As hypothesized, the combination of the hot water and heat sink created the most output voltage; however the combination of the candle and cold water had the highest mean output voltage. A Scheffe test indicated that there were no significant differences between individual heating methods but some differences between combinations; the most significant difference was sunlight versus candle and cold water. The results of this study confirmed that output voltage increased with temperature gradient and also suggested a possible relationship with output voltage and a method’s ability to maintain a temperature gradient that was not mentioned in previous studies.

Start Date

4-11-2015 3:00 PM

End Date

4-11-2015 3:15 PM

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 3:00 PM Apr 11th, 3:15 PM

The effect of various heating and cooling methods on the output voltage of a Peltier tile

Thermoelectricity is believed to be a potential alternative energy source. The purpose of this project was to test the practicability of the Peltier tile and observe how powering methods compare to one another. It was hypothesized that if six combinations of heat sources and cold sources were applied to a Peltier tile and three individual methods involving only the heat sources were applied to a Peltier tile, then the combination of hot water and heat sink would create the most output voltage. Heating methods included candle flame, hot water, and sunlight. Cooling methods included cold water and a heat sink. For this study, a Peltier tile was circuited with the voltmeter. The maximum voltage for each trial was measured after each method was applied to the Peltier tile. Data were statistically analyzed at alpha equal to 0.05 with an ANOVA [F(8,216)=344.991, p=<0.001] and a follow-up Scheffe test. As hypothesized, the combination of the hot water and heat sink created the most output voltage; however the combination of the candle and cold water had the highest mean output voltage. A Scheffe test indicated that there were no significant differences between individual heating methods but some differences between combinations; the most significant difference was sunlight versus candle and cold water. The results of this study confirmed that output voltage increased with temperature gradient and also suggested a possible relationship with output voltage and a method’s ability to maintain a temperature gradient that was not mentioned in previous studies.