Title

A 3D Microscope For Visualization Of Thick Samples

Author(s)

Cameron Maes

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science and Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Engineering

Presentation Type

Mentored

Oral Presentation Award

3rd Place

Abstract

Three dimensional images of cells can be produced by multiphoton excitation and confocal laser scanning microscopy, in which a laser scans the cell point-by-point and layer-by-layer. Though the lateral scan is executed rapidly (several kHz), scanning through the entire depth of thick samples hinders the speed of real-time visualization of the volume. Here we use a different type of laser known as a Bessel beam, which does not diffract based on its unique properties. The beam’s extended focus eliminates the need to scan the depth, allowing the entire volume of the cell to be recorded by a lateral scan of the sample. Recording the volume from two different angles, known as a parallax view, provides the sample’s depth information. This pair of images can be combined using computer code to create a red-cyan stereoscopic image of the volume. These stereo images can be viewed in as a real-time three dimensional scan of a sample.

Start Date

4-11-2015 8:30 AM

End Date

4-11-2015 8:45 AM

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 8:30 AM Apr 11th, 8:45 AM

A 3D Microscope For Visualization Of Thick Samples

Three dimensional images of cells can be produced by multiphoton excitation and confocal laser scanning microscopy, in which a laser scans the cell point-by-point and layer-by-layer. Though the lateral scan is executed rapidly (several kHz), scanning through the entire depth of thick samples hinders the speed of real-time visualization of the volume. Here we use a different type of laser known as a Bessel beam, which does not diffract based on its unique properties. The beam’s extended focus eliminates the need to scan the depth, allowing the entire volume of the cell to be recorded by a lateral scan of the sample. Recording the volume from two different angles, known as a parallax view, provides the sample’s depth information. This pair of images can be combined using computer code to create a red-cyan stereoscopic image of the volume. These stereo images can be viewed in as a real-time three dimensional scan of a sample.