Title

Developing A Test Method To Precisely Induce And Maintain Different Crack Widths In Reinforced Concrete

Author(s)

Julia Daniels

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science and Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Engineering

Presentation Type

Mentored

Mentor

Mentor: Brandon Ross, Glenn Department of Civil Engineering, Clemson University

Abstract

Corrosion causes over $8.3 billion worth of damage to highway bridges each year. In reinforced concrete bridges, steel rebar is reinforced inside of concrete to give the bridge additional strength and safety. Cracks in the concrete, however, provide a path for corrosive material such as chlorides of salt water to access the rebar and cause corrosion. The relationship between corrosion rates due to chloride access and the crack widths of reinforced concrete remains unclear. The objective of this project was to experimentally develop a standard method for testing corrosion rates in cracked concrete. Small concrete blocks with reinforcement bars were built, and a crack was induced through applied forces. A replicable test method to consistently induce cracks of specified widths in reinforced concrete was devised. The most effective design proved to be the beveled inverted rectangular prism of the third generation of reinforced concrete specimens. Future research at Clemson University will apply the test method to evaluate corrosion rates and crack repair strategies.

Start Date

4-11-2015 10:45 AM

End Date

4-11-2015 11:00 AM

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 10:45 AM Apr 11th, 11:00 AM

Developing A Test Method To Precisely Induce And Maintain Different Crack Widths In Reinforced Concrete

Corrosion causes over $8.3 billion worth of damage to highway bridges each year. In reinforced concrete bridges, steel rebar is reinforced inside of concrete to give the bridge additional strength and safety. Cracks in the concrete, however, provide a path for corrosive material such as chlorides of salt water to access the rebar and cause corrosion. The relationship between corrosion rates due to chloride access and the crack widths of reinforced concrete remains unclear. The objective of this project was to experimentally develop a standard method for testing corrosion rates in cracked concrete. Small concrete blocks with reinforcement bars were built, and a crack was induced through applied forces. A replicable test method to consistently induce cracks of specified widths in reinforced concrete was devised. The most effective design proved to be the beveled inverted rectangular prism of the third generation of reinforced concrete specimens. Future research at Clemson University will apply the test method to evaluate corrosion rates and crack repair strategies.