Title

Development and Implementation of an Exercise Prescription Protocol for Lung Cancer Patients Using Internet-Connected Fitness Trackers

School Name

Academic Magnet High School

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Physiology and Health

Presentation Type

Mentored

Abstract

Rationale: Lung cancer and its treatment often result in high symptom burden and reduced quality of life [QoL]. Recently, exercise has been recognized as an effective therapy for the disease, and fitness trackers offer a cheap, objective way of measuring this activity. However, feasibility of such data collection among lung cancer patients needs to be established.

Methods: Forty-three patients with Stage III/IV lung cancer were approached at MUSC’s Combined Thoracic Oncology clinic. Participants were given surveys assessing dyspnea, QoL, and depression, and ten agreed to wear a Fitbit Zip® to collect their step counts for seven days. Associations between survey domains and average daily step counts were assessed using Spearman rank correlations.

Results: Forty of 43 patients [93%] participated, and all approached participants agreed to wear Fitbit® pedometers and returned them with usable step counts. Positive correlations with step counts were noted for physical, social, role, and emotional functioning as well as QoL. Negative correlations were observed with pain, constipation, breathlessness, and insomnia.

Conclusions: Despite high symptom burden, this cohort’s high participation rate, low survey completion time, and 100% activity data collection confirms study feasibility. Active patients with advanced lung cancer report greater overall QoL, suggesting exercise as a therapeutic target in advanced-stage lung cancer.

Start Date

4-11-2015 11:45 AM

End Date

4-11-2015 12:00 PM

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 11:45 AM Apr 11th, 12:00 PM

Development and Implementation of an Exercise Prescription Protocol for Lung Cancer Patients Using Internet-Connected Fitness Trackers

Rationale: Lung cancer and its treatment often result in high symptom burden and reduced quality of life [QoL]. Recently, exercise has been recognized as an effective therapy for the disease, and fitness trackers offer a cheap, objective way of measuring this activity. However, feasibility of such data collection among lung cancer patients needs to be established.

Methods: Forty-three patients with Stage III/IV lung cancer were approached at MUSC’s Combined Thoracic Oncology clinic. Participants were given surveys assessing dyspnea, QoL, and depression, and ten agreed to wear a Fitbit Zip® to collect their step counts for seven days. Associations between survey domains and average daily step counts were assessed using Spearman rank correlations.

Results: Forty of 43 patients [93%] participated, and all approached participants agreed to wear Fitbit® pedometers and returned them with usable step counts. Positive correlations with step counts were noted for physical, social, role, and emotional functioning as well as QoL. Negative correlations were observed with pain, constipation, breathlessness, and insomnia.

Conclusions: Despite high symptom burden, this cohort’s high participation rate, low survey completion time, and 100% activity data collection confirms study feasibility. Active patients with advanced lung cancer report greater overall QoL, suggesting exercise as a therapeutic target in advanced-stage lung cancer.