Title

Effects Of Light Color On Population Growth In Rhodomonas Salina

Author(s)

Patrick McKenzie

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science and Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Environmental Science

Presentation Type

Mentored

Mentor

Mentor: Jeff Dudycha, Department of Biological Science, University of South Carolina

Abstract

Rhodomonas salina is a marine, phycoerythrin member of the phylum Cryptophyceae; an understudied division of algae. Its ecology and evolution are largely unknown, so the purpose of this experiment was to help uncover and describe a part of its ecology. Four samples of R. salina were grown in three boxes that filtered for red, blue, and white light respectively at the same intensity. Population growth was monitored within the box to try to make an accurate prediction of the light environment in which R. salina grow best. The results showed that R. salina had the fastest growth rates in white light, the second fastest in blue, and the slowest in red light. This indicates that R. salina may live below 10 ft. in the ocean’s water column, since red light disappears at about that distance, and red light is the least useful light for R. salina growth. This understanding will provide a better understanding of the ecosystems and food chains in the ocean because, in the areas they live, cryptophytes are often critical to both the total biomass and the dynamics of the food web.

Start Date

4-11-2015 8:30 AM

End Date

4-11-2015 8:45 AM

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 8:30 AM Apr 11th, 8:45 AM

Effects Of Light Color On Population Growth In Rhodomonas Salina

Rhodomonas salina is a marine, phycoerythrin member of the phylum Cryptophyceae; an understudied division of algae. Its ecology and evolution are largely unknown, so the purpose of this experiment was to help uncover and describe a part of its ecology. Four samples of R. salina were grown in three boxes that filtered for red, blue, and white light respectively at the same intensity. Population growth was monitored within the box to try to make an accurate prediction of the light environment in which R. salina grow best. The results showed that R. salina had the fastest growth rates in white light, the second fastest in blue, and the slowest in red light. This indicates that R. salina may live below 10 ft. in the ocean’s water column, since red light disappears at about that distance, and red light is the least useful light for R. salina growth. This understanding will provide a better understanding of the ecosystems and food chains in the ocean because, in the areas they live, cryptophytes are often critical to both the total biomass and the dynamics of the food web.