Title

A meso-level analysis of the effect of perceived economic conditions of a voter on vote choice in a local election in Richland County

Author(s)

Anson T. Bidwell

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Psychology and Sociology

Presentation Type

Mentored

Oral Presentation Award

2nd Place

Written Paper Award

3rd Place

Abstract

The issue of economic voting and pocketbook voting has been well documented by many studies over the years, as it is a key part of the systems of democratic accountability and democratic system. The purpose of the study conducted was to provide data in the not-well documented local level of economic voting. The hypothesis was that, at the local level, there would be a significant relationship between vote choice (incumbent vs. challenger) and economic perception. The procedure was that three bipartisan polling stations were surveyed with a two-question survey, the two questions being about their perception on the economy in the last year and their vote choice on a close local election. The overall data supported the hypothesis, as a chi-square test yielded χ²(4, n=388)=28.19, p<0.0001. A further Cramer’s V test yielded a statistic of 0.1906, indicating a relatively weak relationship. Therefore, it was concluded that at the local level, economic perception does have an effect on vote choice, thus supporting the hypothesis

Start Date

4-11-2015 1:30 PM

End Date

4-11-2015 1:45 PM

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 1:30 PM Apr 11th, 1:45 PM

A meso-level analysis of the effect of perceived economic conditions of a voter on vote choice in a local election in Richland County

The issue of economic voting and pocketbook voting has been well documented by many studies over the years, as it is a key part of the systems of democratic accountability and democratic system. The purpose of the study conducted was to provide data in the not-well documented local level of economic voting. The hypothesis was that, at the local level, there would be a significant relationship between vote choice (incumbent vs. challenger) and economic perception. The procedure was that three bipartisan polling stations were surveyed with a two-question survey, the two questions being about their perception on the economy in the last year and their vote choice on a close local election. The overall data supported the hypothesis, as a chi-square test yielded χ²(4, n=388)=28.19, p<0.0001. A further Cramer’s V test yielded a statistic of 0.1906, indicating a relatively weak relationship. Therefore, it was concluded that at the local level, economic perception does have an effect on vote choice, thus supporting the hypothesis