Title

Pollution-Sensitive Larvae Of Wormaldia Spp. (Trichoptera: Philopotamidae) And Neureclipsis Melco Ross, 1947 (Trichoptera: Polycentropodidae)

Author(s)

Leslie Galvez

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science and Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Zoology

Presentation Type

Mentored

Mentor

Mentor: John C. Morse, School of Agricultural, Forest, and Environmental Sciences, Clemson University

Oral Presentation Award

1st Place

Abstract

Freshwater invertebrates are important organisms for monitoring water quality because the presence or absence of variously pollution-sensitive taxa indicates the severity of pollution. Wormaldia and Neureclipsis are common North American genera, but whereas the adult males of all species in these genera are readily identifiable, most larvae of their species are still unknown to science. To refine the usefulness of these insects for monitoring pollution, it is necessary to associate identifiable adults with their yet-unidentifiable larvae and then to describe the diagnostic features of the larvae. For this research, specimens of Wormaldia and Neureclipsis were collected from freshwater habitats in locations where adults have been observed. The larvae collected were preserved in 95% ethanol and were compared with each other and with previous descriptions. Their species-level identity was determined by reference to DNA sequences of identified adults in the Barcode of Life Database (BOLD). New diagnostic characters were hypothesized and tested by their consistency and co-occurrence, including characters such as the size of the tarsal claws, chaetotaxy, head color pattern, and shape of the foretrochantins. Illustrations and descriptions of these distinguishing features were prepared to facilitate recognition of the species.

Start Date

4-11-2015 11:30 AM

End Date

4-11-2015 11:45 AM

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 11:30 AM Apr 11th, 11:45 AM

Pollution-Sensitive Larvae Of Wormaldia Spp. (Trichoptera: Philopotamidae) And Neureclipsis Melco Ross, 1947 (Trichoptera: Polycentropodidae)

Freshwater invertebrates are important organisms for monitoring water quality because the presence or absence of variously pollution-sensitive taxa indicates the severity of pollution. Wormaldia and Neureclipsis are common North American genera, but whereas the adult males of all species in these genera are readily identifiable, most larvae of their species are still unknown to science. To refine the usefulness of these insects for monitoring pollution, it is necessary to associate identifiable adults with their yet-unidentifiable larvae and then to describe the diagnostic features of the larvae. For this research, specimens of Wormaldia and Neureclipsis were collected from freshwater habitats in locations where adults have been observed. The larvae collected were preserved in 95% ethanol and were compared with each other and with previous descriptions. Their species-level identity was determined by reference to DNA sequences of identified adults in the Barcode of Life Database (BOLD). New diagnostic characters were hypothesized and tested by their consistency and co-occurrence, including characters such as the size of the tarsal claws, chaetotaxy, head color pattern, and shape of the foretrochantins. Illustrations and descriptions of these distinguishing features were prepared to facilitate recognition of the species.