Title

Planar Hall Effect In Thin Ferromagnetic Film’S Dependence Upon External Magnetic Field Angles

Author(s)

Wesley Williams

School Name

Governor's School for Science and Math

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Physics

Presentation Type

Mentored

Mentor

Mentor: Dr. Crittenden; Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina

Oral Presentation Award

1st Place

Written Paper Award

2nd Place

Abstract

When a thin ferromagnetic film is exposed to an altering external magnetic field and a current is run through it, a Hall voltage will be present, leading to the existence of the normal Hall Effect. Due to the internal magnetic field being influenced by the altering external magnetic field, the planar Hall Effect will also come into being, seen when the internal magnetic field “snaps back” to the easy axis of the film. This experiment begins to search for the relationship between the angles at which the external magnetic field that is altered hits the film to the locations of the “peaks” created when reading the Hall voltage due to the “snap back”. Using thin layers of gold and cobalt in Hall triplets hooked into a simple sample holder and placed in the testing platform, a constant current is applied through the Hall triplets, and the Hall voltage is collected. An external magnet above the platform is fed a current that oscillates to cause the change in the Hall voltage. These results could go on to improve extremely sensitive magnetic field detectors that use the planar Hall Effect, and increase ease for scientists who work with the planar Hall Effect.

Location

Owens 104

Start Date

4-16-2016 9:15 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 9:15 AM

Planar Hall Effect In Thin Ferromagnetic Film’S Dependence Upon External Magnetic Field Angles

Owens 104

When a thin ferromagnetic film is exposed to an altering external magnetic field and a current is run through it, a Hall voltage will be present, leading to the existence of the normal Hall Effect. Due to the internal magnetic field being influenced by the altering external magnetic field, the planar Hall Effect will also come into being, seen when the internal magnetic field “snaps back” to the easy axis of the film. This experiment begins to search for the relationship between the angles at which the external magnetic field that is altered hits the film to the locations of the “peaks” created when reading the Hall voltage due to the “snap back”. Using thin layers of gold and cobalt in Hall triplets hooked into a simple sample holder and placed in the testing platform, a constant current is applied through the Hall triplets, and the Hall voltage is collected. An external magnet above the platform is fed a current that oscillates to cause the change in the Hall voltage. These results could go on to improve extremely sensitive magnetic field detectors that use the planar Hall Effect, and increase ease for scientists who work with the planar Hall Effect.