Title

The Effect Of Ovariectomy On Skeletal Muscle Autophagy Signaling In The Female Apcmin/+ Mouse

Author(s)

Emilia Ballou

School Name

Governor's School for Science and Math

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Physiology and Health

Presentation Type

Mentored

Mentor

Mentor: Dr. Carson; Department of Exercise Science, University of South Carolina

Abstract

Metabolic abnormalities and inflammation in cancer lead to cancer cachexia, a deadly loss in fat and skeletal mass. While the mechanisms of cancer cachexia are well defined in males, very little is known about this etiology in female. Autophagy plays a role in muscle wasting in male ApcMin/+ mice; however, the role of autophagy has not been investigated in the female. Previous studies have found that while some muscle proteins involved in inflammatory signaling decreased in cachectic males, they increased in cachectic females. It is known that the hormone estrogen inhibits the signaling of IL6, a proinflammatory signal. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of ovarian function on autophagy signaling during cachexia progression in the ApcMin/+ mouse. We manipulated the variables of cancer and ovarian function and analyzed their effects on the autophagy markers Bax and Cathepsin. We used three experimental groups; ovaries-intact ApcMin/+ and B6 mice, and ovariectomized ApcMin/+ mice. Results from this study indicated that cancer increased autophagy signaling in the female, but ovariectomy did not cause a further change.

Location

Owens 107

Start Date

4-16-2016 8:30 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 8:30 AM

The Effect Of Ovariectomy On Skeletal Muscle Autophagy Signaling In The Female Apcmin/+ Mouse

Owens 107

Metabolic abnormalities and inflammation in cancer lead to cancer cachexia, a deadly loss in fat and skeletal mass. While the mechanisms of cancer cachexia are well defined in males, very little is known about this etiology in female. Autophagy plays a role in muscle wasting in male ApcMin/+ mice; however, the role of autophagy has not been investigated in the female. Previous studies have found that while some muscle proteins involved in inflammatory signaling decreased in cachectic males, they increased in cachectic females. It is known that the hormone estrogen inhibits the signaling of IL6, a proinflammatory signal. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of ovarian function on autophagy signaling during cachexia progression in the ApcMin/+ mouse. We manipulated the variables of cancer and ovarian function and analyzed their effects on the autophagy markers Bax and Cathepsin. We used three experimental groups; ovaries-intact ApcMin/+ and B6 mice, and ovariectomized ApcMin/+ mice. Results from this study indicated that cancer increased autophagy signaling in the female, but ovariectomy did not cause a further change.