Title

The Effect Of Cilia On Cardiac Valve Diseases

Author(s)

Joshua Nguyen

School Name

Governor's School for Science and Math

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Physiology and Health

Presentation Type

Mentored

Mentor

Mentor: Dr. Norris; Department of Regenerative Medicine and Cell Biology, Medical University of South Carolina

Abstract

Cardiac valve diseases are found in roughly 10% percent of the population, forcing many people to undergo surgery (Norris, 2015). Previous studies have shown that the cardiac valve diseases were related to a gene called DZIP1, which is necessary for primary cilia formation (Durst, et. al, 2015). This project focused on observing and showing primary cilia is required for cell differentiation. Immunohistochemical stains on wild type and cilia knockout mice were performed and 3D reconstructions were used to observe valve structure and volume. There was an increase Sox 9 and Runx 2 in the knockout, suggesting that differentiation is affected by loss of cilia. The results of the 3D reconstruction showed that the knockout valve had an increase in volume and shape compared the wild type valve. This work has capitalized on genetic data from patients with cardiac valve diseases and shows how primary cilia are important as a previously unrecognized contributor to valve disease.

Location

Owens 107

Start Date

4-16-2016 10:45 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 10:45 AM

The Effect Of Cilia On Cardiac Valve Diseases

Owens 107

Cardiac valve diseases are found in roughly 10% percent of the population, forcing many people to undergo surgery (Norris, 2015). Previous studies have shown that the cardiac valve diseases were related to a gene called DZIP1, which is necessary for primary cilia formation (Durst, et. al, 2015). This project focused on observing and showing primary cilia is required for cell differentiation. Immunohistochemical stains on wild type and cilia knockout mice were performed and 3D reconstructions were used to observe valve structure and volume. There was an increase Sox 9 and Runx 2 in the knockout, suggesting that differentiation is affected by loss of cilia. The results of the 3D reconstruction showed that the knockout valve had an increase in volume and shape compared the wild type valve. This work has capitalized on genetic data from patients with cardiac valve diseases and shows how primary cilia are important as a previously unrecognized contributor to valve disease.