Title

Associations Between Rate Of Speech And Cardiac Arousal Within Females That Express The Fmr1 Premutation

Author(s)

Emma Harris

School Name

Governor's School for Science and Math

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Psychology and Sociology

Presentation Type

Mentored

Mentor

Mentor: Dr. Klusek; Department of Psychology, University of South Carolina

Abstract

The focus of this research is on women who have the FMR1 gene premutation. Those with the premutation are “carriers” of the fragile X mutation. The FMR1 premutation is highly prevalent within the United States, affecting 1 in every 151 women. The impact of the premutation can be far reaching. For example, the National Fragile X Foundation explains, “We now know that some women with premutation have infertility or fragile X-associated tremor ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), while those with full mutations may have learning or psychiatric issues.” Many women with this condition have average or above average intelligence, but suffer with anxiety or high amounts of shyness. Individuals with the full mutation on the FMR1 gene, or fragile X syndrome, have fast rates of speech that are thought to be caused by anxiety and hyperarousal. This study aims to determine the relationship between cardiac arousal and rate of speech in women with the FMR1 premutation. Rate of speech will be measured as the average number of words used per minute in a five minute language sample. Cardiac arousal will be measured by the average heart rate during that same span. The findings should contribute to our understanding of the language phenotype of the FMR1 premutation and its mechanisms, as well as inform potential relationships between hyperarousal and rapid rate of speech in children with fragile X syndrome.

Location

Owens 108

Start Date

4-16-2016 9:00 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 9:00 AM

Associations Between Rate Of Speech And Cardiac Arousal Within Females That Express The Fmr1 Premutation

Owens 108

The focus of this research is on women who have the FMR1 gene premutation. Those with the premutation are “carriers” of the fragile X mutation. The FMR1 premutation is highly prevalent within the United States, affecting 1 in every 151 women. The impact of the premutation can be far reaching. For example, the National Fragile X Foundation explains, “We now know that some women with premutation have infertility or fragile X-associated tremor ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), while those with full mutations may have learning or psychiatric issues.” Many women with this condition have average or above average intelligence, but suffer with anxiety or high amounts of shyness. Individuals with the full mutation on the FMR1 gene, or fragile X syndrome, have fast rates of speech that are thought to be caused by anxiety and hyperarousal. This study aims to determine the relationship between cardiac arousal and rate of speech in women with the FMR1 premutation. Rate of speech will be measured as the average number of words used per minute in a five minute language sample. Cardiac arousal will be measured by the average heart rate during that same span. The findings should contribute to our understanding of the language phenotype of the FMR1 premutation and its mechanisms, as well as inform potential relationships between hyperarousal and rapid rate of speech in children with fragile X syndrome.