Title

Creating A Mathematical Model Of Three-Component Dppc/Dopc/Cholesterol Model Lipid Bilayers

Author(s)

Zachary Klein

School Name

Governor's School for Science and Math

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Biochemistry

Presentation Type

Mentored

Mentor

Mentor: Dr. Uline; Department of Chemical Engineering, University of South Carolina

Abstract

The purpose of the research conducted was to find a mathematical model of a three-component lipid bilayer composed of a saturated lipid, unsaturated lipid, and cholesterol (DPPC, DOPC, and cholesterol, respectively). The discovery of distinct, separate domains in lipid bilayers in 1982 led to a new understanding of lipid bilayers and cell membranes. A rather controversial theory known as lipid raft theory was introduced soon after that served to explain this behavior, suggesting that rafts of the liquid-ordered domain exist, and that certain proteins are raft-associating. The implications of this are massive in several fields – if it were possible to control the composition and formation of these rafts, then certain diseases could be cured or prevented. As such, this research served to help create a better understanding of how the compositions in the liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains are related. The model was based on Putzel and Schick's mathematical model of three-component systems in different phases. Using Fortran, the compositions of each phase were computed, and the resulting diagram formed a closed phase region resembling that of the experimentally created diagram. Future research is needed to confirm the model's thermodynamic validity.

Location

Owens 203

Start Date

4-16-2016 10:30 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 10:30 AM

Creating A Mathematical Model Of Three-Component Dppc/Dopc/Cholesterol Model Lipid Bilayers

Owens 203

The purpose of the research conducted was to find a mathematical model of a three-component lipid bilayer composed of a saturated lipid, unsaturated lipid, and cholesterol (DPPC, DOPC, and cholesterol, respectively). The discovery of distinct, separate domains in lipid bilayers in 1982 led to a new understanding of lipid bilayers and cell membranes. A rather controversial theory known as lipid raft theory was introduced soon after that served to explain this behavior, suggesting that rafts of the liquid-ordered domain exist, and that certain proteins are raft-associating. The implications of this are massive in several fields – if it were possible to control the composition and formation of these rafts, then certain diseases could be cured or prevented. As such, this research served to help create a better understanding of how the compositions in the liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains are related. The model was based on Putzel and Schick's mathematical model of three-component systems in different phases. Using Fortran, the compositions of each phase were computed, and the resulting diagram formed a closed phase region resembling that of the experimentally created diagram. Future research is needed to confirm the model's thermodynamic validity.