Title

The Attractivness Of Light Within The Visible Spectrum To The Beetle Genera Phyllophaga, Phanaeus, And The Family Carabidae

Author(s)

Joshua Dunford

School Name

Governor's School for Science and Math

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Zoology

Presentation Type

Mentored

Mentor

Mentor: Dr. Culin; Department of Entomology, Clemson University

Oral Presentation Award

2nd Place

Abstract

The attractiveness of light to insects is an issue that affects households across America. The issue of the porch light becoming a gathering place for insects creates a nuisance for the porch owner. Three taxa of beetles are particularly attracted to the lights used in this study. These beetles; May beetles (Genus: Phyllophaga), Scarab Beetles (Genus: Phanaeus), and Ground Beetles (Family: Carabidae), are able to be tested in order to see how insects are attracted to light, and what colors and types are the most attractive. The beetles were attracted and trapped by a light trap created by Dr. Joseph Culin out of recyclable materials. The individual traps had lights along the spectrum of visible light, 380 to 740 nm. These lights had the colors of red, orange, yellow, blue, green, and white. These traps were then used for three consecutive nights with different types of colored bulbs. The bulb types used were incandescent (25 W, GE Incandescent Bulb), fluorescent (25 W, Sylvania Fluorescent Bulb), and LED (25 W, GE LED Bulb). The objective of this experiment is to determine which type of bulb and which colors are most efficient in terms of attraction of insects, specifically with these three species of beetles. Within the scientific community it allows etymologists to infer what lights can be used within bug traps in order to obtain the greatest yield of specimen.

Location

Kinard 119

Start Date

4-16-2016 11:00 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 11:00 AM

The Attractivness Of Light Within The Visible Spectrum To The Beetle Genera Phyllophaga, Phanaeus, And The Family Carabidae

Kinard 119

The attractiveness of light to insects is an issue that affects households across America. The issue of the porch light becoming a gathering place for insects creates a nuisance for the porch owner. Three taxa of beetles are particularly attracted to the lights used in this study. These beetles; May beetles (Genus: Phyllophaga), Scarab Beetles (Genus: Phanaeus), and Ground Beetles (Family: Carabidae), are able to be tested in order to see how insects are attracted to light, and what colors and types are the most attractive. The beetles were attracted and trapped by a light trap created by Dr. Joseph Culin out of recyclable materials. The individual traps had lights along the spectrum of visible light, 380 to 740 nm. These lights had the colors of red, orange, yellow, blue, green, and white. These traps were then used for three consecutive nights with different types of colored bulbs. The bulb types used were incandescent (25 W, GE Incandescent Bulb), fluorescent (25 W, Sylvania Fluorescent Bulb), and LED (25 W, GE LED Bulb). The objective of this experiment is to determine which type of bulb and which colors are most efficient in terms of attraction of insects, specifically with these three species of beetles. Within the scientific community it allows etymologists to infer what lights can be used within bug traps in order to obtain the greatest yield of specimen.