Title

A Biological Study On The Differences Between Mosquito And Black Fly Physiology Via The Transplantation Of Trichomycetes

Author(s)

Morgan Jones

School Name

Governor's School for Science and Math

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Zoology

Presentation Type

Mentored

Mentor

Mentor: Dr. Beard; Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Clemson University

Abstract

Black flies and mosquitos are both common vectors of disease. They are structurally similar in their peritrophic matrices. Within the larvae of the black flies grows a symbiotic trichomycete fungus known as Harpella melusinae. It readily grows in the midguts of black fly larvae and releases spores into the water, but it does not seem to adapt well to the midguts of mosquito larvae. We asked if we could successfully transplant H. melusinae into mosquito larvae. Wild black fly larvae, Simulium innoxium, were captured to secure spores to transplant into mosquito larvae. We attempted to transplant the H. melusinae into four mosquito species, Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus, Culex quinquefasciatus, and Anopheles quadrimaculatus, by four different methods, three of which directly fed the spores to mosquito species. Exposed mosquitoes were dissected and their peritrophic matrices were observed for trichomycete presence. Some H. melusinae spores and sprouts were found inside the mosquitoes’ matrices; however, not enough spores or sprouts were found to make any conclusions as to whether Harpella melusinae can truly grow inside mosquitoes. The next step in the study is to repeat the experiment with more mosquitoes, to determine if the results are viable or not.

Location

Kinard 119

Start Date

4-16-2016 10:30 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 10:30 AM

A Biological Study On The Differences Between Mosquito And Black Fly Physiology Via The Transplantation Of Trichomycetes

Kinard 119

Black flies and mosquitos are both common vectors of disease. They are structurally similar in their peritrophic matrices. Within the larvae of the black flies grows a symbiotic trichomycete fungus known as Harpella melusinae. It readily grows in the midguts of black fly larvae and releases spores into the water, but it does not seem to adapt well to the midguts of mosquito larvae. We asked if we could successfully transplant H. melusinae into mosquito larvae. Wild black fly larvae, Simulium innoxium, were captured to secure spores to transplant into mosquito larvae. We attempted to transplant the H. melusinae into four mosquito species, Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus, Culex quinquefasciatus, and Anopheles quadrimaculatus, by four different methods, three of which directly fed the spores to mosquito species. Exposed mosquitoes were dissected and their peritrophic matrices were observed for trichomycete presence. Some H. melusinae spores and sprouts were found inside the mosquitoes’ matrices; however, not enough spores or sprouts were found to make any conclusions as to whether Harpella melusinae can truly grow inside mosquitoes. The next step in the study is to repeat the experiment with more mosquitoes, to determine if the results are viable or not.