Title

In Vitro Efficacy Of Doxorubicin Encapsulated In Thermosensitive Liposomes (Tsl)

Author(s)

Emily Milz

School Name

Governor's School for Science and Math

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Biochemistry

Presentation Type

Mentored

Mentor

Mentor: Dr. Haemmerich; Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of South Carolina

Oral Presentation Award

1st Place

Written Paper Award

1st Place

Abstract

Drug delivery systems aim to reduce the side effects of cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs by targeting tumor cells. Thermosensitive liposomes (TSL) act as one such system by encapsulating chemotherapy drugs until heated to 42°C. This research focuses on TSL that encapsulate doxorubicin, a chemotherapy drug used to treat aggressive cancers. Our goal was to demonstrate that unheated TSL will not release their doxorubicin contents and have the potential to reduce doxorubicin’s side effects. We treated two microplates, one heated and one non-heated, of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells with concentrations of either unencapsulated doxorubicin or TSL encapsulated doxorubicin ranging from 10 nM to 100000 nM. We then performed viability assays to determine percent remaining viable cells at different doxorubicin concentrations. Lower percentages of cells remained viable in the heated microplate compared to the non-heated microplate, which indicates that more doxorubicin was released from TSL when heated. In both microplates, fewer cells remained alive in wells treated with unencapsulated doxorubicin compared to those treated with TSL encapsulated doxorubicin. Although these results support our hypothesis that TSL encapsulated doxorubicin would be the least cytotoxic, the slight percent decrease in remaining viable cells after treatment with TSL encapsulated doxorubicin in non-heated conditions indicates that some doxorubicin was released from the TSL even without a heat trigger. This suggests that fragile TSL do not completely eradicate doxorubicin’s side effects due to drug leakage. In future experiments, a wider range of low doxorubicin concentrations could be tested to evaluate the extent of TSL leakage.

Location

Owens 203

Start Date

4-16-2016 10:45 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 10:45 AM

In Vitro Efficacy Of Doxorubicin Encapsulated In Thermosensitive Liposomes (Tsl)

Owens 203

Drug delivery systems aim to reduce the side effects of cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs by targeting tumor cells. Thermosensitive liposomes (TSL) act as one such system by encapsulating chemotherapy drugs until heated to 42°C. This research focuses on TSL that encapsulate doxorubicin, a chemotherapy drug used to treat aggressive cancers. Our goal was to demonstrate that unheated TSL will not release their doxorubicin contents and have the potential to reduce doxorubicin’s side effects. We treated two microplates, one heated and one non-heated, of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells with concentrations of either unencapsulated doxorubicin or TSL encapsulated doxorubicin ranging from 10 nM to 100000 nM. We then performed viability assays to determine percent remaining viable cells at different doxorubicin concentrations. Lower percentages of cells remained viable in the heated microplate compared to the non-heated microplate, which indicates that more doxorubicin was released from TSL when heated. In both microplates, fewer cells remained alive in wells treated with unencapsulated doxorubicin compared to those treated with TSL encapsulated doxorubicin. Although these results support our hypothesis that TSL encapsulated doxorubicin would be the least cytotoxic, the slight percent decrease in remaining viable cells after treatment with TSL encapsulated doxorubicin in non-heated conditions indicates that some doxorubicin was released from the TSL even without a heat trigger. This suggests that fragile TSL do not completely eradicate doxorubicin’s side effects due to drug leakage. In future experiments, a wider range of low doxorubicin concentrations could be tested to evaluate the extent of TSL leakage.