Title

The Impact And Sustainability Of Infectious Disease Pharmacist Interventions On Reducing Antiretroviral Errors And Error Duration In A Critically Ill Hiv-Infected Population Over A Five-Year Intervention Period /

Author(s)

Tanvi Mehta

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Physiology and Health

Presentation Type

Mentored

Mentor

Mentor: Dr Brandon Bookstaver; South Carolina College of Pharmacy and Palmetto Health Richland

Written Paper Award

3rd Place

Abstract

Antiretroviral (ARV) medications have been used to reduce the mortality and severity of illnesses that accompany Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but ARV medication errors pose a serious threat for reducing effectiveness and harming HIV patients. Many of these patients require hospital admission, and a substantial portion require management in an intensive care unit (ICU). Those admitted in the ICU may have a particularly higher risk for medication errors. The primary purpose of this study is to determine the percentage of HIV patients in the ICU who experienced ARV-associated errors. A retrospective chart review was conducted among patients who had HIV or AIDS in the ICU. Patient charts were reviewed for demographic information, medication history, and medical information. ARV-related errors were identified and classified. It was found that over 67% of patients were male, over 85% were African-American, and almost 30% of patients were not placed on an ARV regimen. Preliminary results show that there were 118 patients with errors and 190 total errors, with some patients having multiple errors. In total 60.2% of patients experienced some type of medication error. Further analysis showed that the most common error was a dose omission (32.6% of the errors). Other common errors include complete regimen omissions (24.7%) and dosing errors (16.3%). Further analysis will be completed to verify drug-drug interactions, crushable medication errors, and analyze risk factors. A future study will be aimed to determine if errors that occur in the ICU cause an increase in patients’ viral loads.

Location

Owens 107

Start Date

4-16-2016 9:15 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 9:15 AM

The Impact And Sustainability Of Infectious Disease Pharmacist Interventions On Reducing Antiretroviral Errors And Error Duration In A Critically Ill Hiv-Infected Population Over A Five-Year Intervention Period /

Owens 107

Antiretroviral (ARV) medications have been used to reduce the mortality and severity of illnesses that accompany Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but ARV medication errors pose a serious threat for reducing effectiveness and harming HIV patients. Many of these patients require hospital admission, and a substantial portion require management in an intensive care unit (ICU). Those admitted in the ICU may have a particularly higher risk for medication errors. The primary purpose of this study is to determine the percentage of HIV patients in the ICU who experienced ARV-associated errors. A retrospective chart review was conducted among patients who had HIV or AIDS in the ICU. Patient charts were reviewed for demographic information, medication history, and medical information. ARV-related errors were identified and classified. It was found that over 67% of patients were male, over 85% were African-American, and almost 30% of patients were not placed on an ARV regimen. Preliminary results show that there were 118 patients with errors and 190 total errors, with some patients having multiple errors. In total 60.2% of patients experienced some type of medication error. Further analysis showed that the most common error was a dose omission (32.6% of the errors). Other common errors include complete regimen omissions (24.7%) and dosing errors (16.3%). Further analysis will be completed to verify drug-drug interactions, crushable medication errors, and analyze risk factors. A future study will be aimed to determine if errors that occur in the ICU cause an increase in patients’ viral loads.