Title

Designing A Stretching Device To Improve Efficiency Of Congenital Muscular Torticollis Treatment

Author(s)

Hillary Melton

School Name

Center for Advanced Technical Studies

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Physiology and Health

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Congenital muscular torticollis causes the head to tilt towards one side resulting in limited range of motion. This condition occurs in approximately one in every three hundred births. There is not a device used during stretching to lessen the stress associated with the treatment and to make the treatment more engaging for patients. If a versatile, freestanding device that support congenital muscular torticollis patients during their stretching period is created, then the infants will become more engaged in the treatment— lessening the stress and direct engagement of the caregiver. During physical therapy consultations, patients will participate in traditional stretching methods, and they will test the stretching device prototype. Data is collected from parents completing a survey. The survey addresses the diagnosis of congenital muscular torticollis, parents’ stress level, execution of the stretch, and infant engagement. Survey results will be analyzed and a redesigned prototype will be tested if necessary. It is anticipated that physical therapists and parent involvement will decrease with the prototype while infant engagement, execution of the stretch, and equipment accessibility will improve.

Location

Owens G01

Start Date

4-16-2016 10:30 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 10:30 AM

Designing A Stretching Device To Improve Efficiency Of Congenital Muscular Torticollis Treatment

Owens G01

Congenital muscular torticollis causes the head to tilt towards one side resulting in limited range of motion. This condition occurs in approximately one in every three hundred births. There is not a device used during stretching to lessen the stress associated with the treatment and to make the treatment more engaging for patients. If a versatile, freestanding device that support congenital muscular torticollis patients during their stretching period is created, then the infants will become more engaged in the treatment— lessening the stress and direct engagement of the caregiver. During physical therapy consultations, patients will participate in traditional stretching methods, and they will test the stretching device prototype. Data is collected from parents completing a survey. The survey addresses the diagnosis of congenital muscular torticollis, parents’ stress level, execution of the stretch, and infant engagement. Survey results will be analyzed and a redesigned prototype will be tested if necessary. It is anticipated that physical therapists and parent involvement will decrease with the prototype while infant engagement, execution of the stretch, and equipment accessibility will improve.