Title

Gemini: A Study Of The Duality In Behavior Analyses Assesments

Author(s)

Jamie Milliff

School Name

Chapin High School

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Physiology and Health

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

The purpose of this project was to develop an proactive threat assessment that could be used to determine patterns of threatening behavior to public safety before a crime was committed. This assessment would use pre-existing criminal profiling techniques and a wide variety of psychological findings from the past century to determine patterns of behavior leading up to criminal actions. Over the course of this research, it was discovered that this type of assessment could not be used in a Criminal Justice setting, as it was initially intended, due to its requirement of highly sensitive personal information to complete a full analysis. Collecting this information would break privacy laws and violate privacy rights afforded to citizens in most civilized nations. The focus of the research then shifted to developing a threat assessment that could be used by lay people such as administrators and parents without training in profiling techniques who may be worried about a student or child. Interviews with members of faculty from local high schools and law enforcement departments are pending. The data collected from these interviews would be used to show how useful this kind of assessment might be in preventing tragedies like school shootings or adolescent homicides and suicides. This has implications in the safety of institutions, and may be able to provide a firmer understanding and handling of atypical behavior throughout society.

Location

Owens G01

Start Date

4-16-2016 11:00 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 11:00 AM

Gemini: A Study Of The Duality In Behavior Analyses Assesments

Owens G01

The purpose of this project was to develop an proactive threat assessment that could be used to determine patterns of threatening behavior to public safety before a crime was committed. This assessment would use pre-existing criminal profiling techniques and a wide variety of psychological findings from the past century to determine patterns of behavior leading up to criminal actions. Over the course of this research, it was discovered that this type of assessment could not be used in a Criminal Justice setting, as it was initially intended, due to its requirement of highly sensitive personal information to complete a full analysis. Collecting this information would break privacy laws and violate privacy rights afforded to citizens in most civilized nations. The focus of the research then shifted to developing a threat assessment that could be used by lay people such as administrators and parents without training in profiling techniques who may be worried about a student or child. Interviews with members of faculty from local high schools and law enforcement departments are pending. The data collected from these interviews would be used to show how useful this kind of assessment might be in preventing tragedies like school shootings or adolescent homicides and suicides. This has implications in the safety of institutions, and may be able to provide a firmer understanding and handling of atypical behavior throughout society.