Title

Association Of Grapheme-Color Synesthesia To Sat Scores

Author(s)

Adam Abdulrahman

School Name

Chapin High School

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Psychology and Sociology

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Oral Presentation Award

1st Place

Abstract

A survey was given to look for an association between Grapheme-Color Synesthesia, the neurological overlap between colors and graphemes (letters and numbers), and SAT scores in all 3 sections (Writing, Reading, and Math). The survey was given randomly to 51 Juniors or Seniors through their homeroom classes throughout Chapin High School, 5 of which showed having synesthesia. The survey was comprised of questions which would determine whether or not a student had synesthesia, by evidence of association and consistency, as well as their average SAT score range in all 3 subjects. The students were compared in each category and score range, through a 2 Proportions Z Test, between those who did and didn’t show synesthesia. All association resulted in nonsignificant data, with the exception of the 500-590 (the national average) range in the English section, with subjects with synesthesia showing a stronger association to this score range than non synesthetes, with a p-value=0.03. This suggests that the processes involved with answering SAT questions is different than those involved in the associations made in synesthetes. This was surprising as both color and academic skills are associated with the Parietal Lobe. This may suggest that, although these skills are similar in location, they are fundamentally different, where the associations made in synesthesia are independent of the processing necessary to complete tasks in reading, writing, and mathematics. /

Location

Owens 109

Start Date

4-16-2016 8:30 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 8:30 AM

Association Of Grapheme-Color Synesthesia To Sat Scores

Owens 109

A survey was given to look for an association between Grapheme-Color Synesthesia, the neurological overlap between colors and graphemes (letters and numbers), and SAT scores in all 3 sections (Writing, Reading, and Math). The survey was given randomly to 51 Juniors or Seniors through their homeroom classes throughout Chapin High School, 5 of which showed having synesthesia. The survey was comprised of questions which would determine whether or not a student had synesthesia, by evidence of association and consistency, as well as their average SAT score range in all 3 subjects. The students were compared in each category and score range, through a 2 Proportions Z Test, between those who did and didn’t show synesthesia. All association resulted in nonsignificant data, with the exception of the 500-590 (the national average) range in the English section, with subjects with synesthesia showing a stronger association to this score range than non synesthetes, with a p-value=0.03. This suggests that the processes involved with answering SAT questions is different than those involved in the associations made in synesthetes. This was surprising as both color and academic skills are associated with the Parietal Lobe. This may suggest that, although these skills are similar in location, they are fundamentally different, where the associations made in synesthesia are independent of the processing necessary to complete tasks in reading, writing, and mathematics. /