Title

The Effect Of Chlorine And Bleach On The Color Intensity Of Pig Skin

Author(s)

Jaylen Davis

School Name

Heathwood Hall Episcopal School

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Biochemistry

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Oral Presentation Award

1st Place

Written Paper Award

1st Place

Abstract

The purpose of this experiment is to investigate the effect of chlorine and bleach on pigskin, which is similar to human skin. This project will help people who enjoy pools, to determine the effect of commonly used pool chemicals on their skin. It is hypothesized that if chlorine reacts with pigskin to a greater extent than bleach, it will make the pigskin lighter than the other variable will. 30 samples of pig skin were cut and were measured for light intensity, using imagej. They were then placed in petri dishes, where they were soaked in the water from the chlorine pool simulation for 45 minutes. After this, they were rinsed, and their light intensity was measured. The chlorine pool simulation consisted of .0198 grams of chlorine, 1 gallon of water and .0181 grams of soda ash. The same process was repeated in the water from the bleach pool simulation. The bleach pool simulation consisted of .0189 grams of bleach, 1 gallon of water and .0181 grams of soda ash. Although chlorine had a greater effect on the color intensity, a T-test showed that the effect was not significant. This proves the null hypothesis, which is that chlorine reacts with pigskin the same as or to a lesser extent than bleach, it will make the pigskin lighter than bleach.

Location

Owens 204

Start Date

4-16-2016 9:30 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 9:30 AM

The Effect Of Chlorine And Bleach On The Color Intensity Of Pig Skin

Owens 204

The purpose of this experiment is to investigate the effect of chlorine and bleach on pigskin, which is similar to human skin. This project will help people who enjoy pools, to determine the effect of commonly used pool chemicals on their skin. It is hypothesized that if chlorine reacts with pigskin to a greater extent than bleach, it will make the pigskin lighter than the other variable will. 30 samples of pig skin were cut and were measured for light intensity, using imagej. They were then placed in petri dishes, where they were soaked in the water from the chlorine pool simulation for 45 minutes. After this, they were rinsed, and their light intensity was measured. The chlorine pool simulation consisted of .0198 grams of chlorine, 1 gallon of water and .0181 grams of soda ash. The same process was repeated in the water from the bleach pool simulation. The bleach pool simulation consisted of .0189 grams of bleach, 1 gallon of water and .0181 grams of soda ash. Although chlorine had a greater effect on the color intensity, a T-test showed that the effect was not significant. This proves the null hypothesis, which is that chlorine reacts with pigskin the same as or to a lesser extent than bleach, it will make the pigskin lighter than bleach.