Title

The Effect Of Enzyme Concentration, Presence Or Absence Of An Enzyme, Ph Level, And The Presence And Absence Of Substrates On Enzyme Reaction Rate And The Determination Of What Levels Each Variable Must Be To Have An Optimal Reaction Rate For Algae-Based Biofuel Production.

School Name

Heathwood Hall Episcopal School

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Biochemistry

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Enzyme functionality encompasses all facets of life on Earth. Whether in a single celled organism, or an organism as complex as humans, enzyme functionality and production is vital to life. This staple function in all living things can be studied, and even used to benefit society and the environment. Today’s world requires the production of energy. By way of burning fossil fuels, using the powerful flow of water from the Colorado River, or using the heat from the innards of the Earth, energy production is a necessity today, and will be for generations to come. Another way to produce fuel, one cleaner than burning fossil fuels and maybe more practical than hydroelectric and geothermal energy, is the consumption of biofuels. Biofuels is a category that encompasses a massive amount of different fuels, but we will focus more on those biofuels that are produced by algae. If we can better understand the enzymes in algaes that break things down to produce biofuels, an optimal condition for these enzymes can be found to maximize production of this biofuel. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of enzyme concentration, presence and absence of enzymes, pH level, and the presence and absence of substrates on enzyme reaction rate and the determination of what levels each variable must be at to have an optimal reaction rate for algae-based biofuel production. The tested independent variables for this study were the Enzyme concentration, Presence or absence of an enzyme, pH level, and Substrate concentration. The dependent variable was the biofuel enzyme reaction rate. The hypothesis was that If an optimal condition for an enzyme reaction can be projected, then data from enzyme reaction rates where pH, Enzyme concentration, Substrate concentration, and the presence and absence of the enzyme can help determine an optimal condition. The results did support this hypothesis. When the enzyme and its substrate reacted, a yellow coloring became present in the solution. Using a spectrophotometer, we used the amount of yellow coloring to quantify the level of the reaction that took place. From the data we gathered, we can hypothesize on what optimal conditions for this particular enzyme to function at its peak potential.

Location

Owens 204

Start Date

4-16-2016 10:00 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 10:00 AM

The Effect Of Enzyme Concentration, Presence Or Absence Of An Enzyme, Ph Level, And The Presence And Absence Of Substrates On Enzyme Reaction Rate And The Determination Of What Levels Each Variable Must Be To Have An Optimal Reaction Rate For Algae-Based Biofuel Production.

Owens 204

Enzyme functionality encompasses all facets of life on Earth. Whether in a single celled organism, or an organism as complex as humans, enzyme functionality and production is vital to life. This staple function in all living things can be studied, and even used to benefit society and the environment. Today’s world requires the production of energy. By way of burning fossil fuels, using the powerful flow of water from the Colorado River, or using the heat from the innards of the Earth, energy production is a necessity today, and will be for generations to come. Another way to produce fuel, one cleaner than burning fossil fuels and maybe more practical than hydroelectric and geothermal energy, is the consumption of biofuels. Biofuels is a category that encompasses a massive amount of different fuels, but we will focus more on those biofuels that are produced by algae. If we can better understand the enzymes in algaes that break things down to produce biofuels, an optimal condition for these enzymes can be found to maximize production of this biofuel. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of enzyme concentration, presence and absence of enzymes, pH level, and the presence and absence of substrates on enzyme reaction rate and the determination of what levels each variable must be at to have an optimal reaction rate for algae-based biofuel production. The tested independent variables for this study were the Enzyme concentration, Presence or absence of an enzyme, pH level, and Substrate concentration. The dependent variable was the biofuel enzyme reaction rate. The hypothesis was that If an optimal condition for an enzyme reaction can be projected, then data from enzyme reaction rates where pH, Enzyme concentration, Substrate concentration, and the presence and absence of the enzyme can help determine an optimal condition. The results did support this hypothesis. When the enzyme and its substrate reacted, a yellow coloring became present in the solution. Using a spectrophotometer, we used the amount of yellow coloring to quantify the level of the reaction that took place. From the data we gathered, we can hypothesize on what optimal conditions for this particular enzyme to function at its peak potential.