Title

Renewable Energy Sources; Locating The Nm2448 Mutant Gene For Senescence In Maize (Zea Mays L.) Cells To Lengthen The Lifespan Of The Crop For Use In Biofuels

Author(s)

Anna Kulangara

School Name

Governor's School for Science and Math

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Botany

Presentation Type

Mentored

Mentor

Mentor: Dr. Sekhon; Department of Genetics and Biochemistry, Clemson University

Oral Presentation Award

2nd Place

Abstract

Senescence in Zea mays or maize plants is the programmed death of leaves and other organs that occurs at the end of a plant’s lifespan, seen in most plants during the autumn season. The goal of this project was to locate the genes controlling senescence in the leaves of maize in order to lengthen the crop’s lifespan and to allow plants to make more sugars through photosynthesis. The sugars in the grain or seed will be used as human and animal feed, while sugars in the leaves, stems, and other plant parts can be used for animal feed and as renewable energy sources. This project included fieldwork as well as laboratory work. The primary purpose of the fieldwork was to self-pollinate each corn plant and prevent contamination of the mutant corn plants’ genes. DNA of many mutant plants, that showed early senescence, was amplified through PCR reactions and then evaluated during gel electrophoresis in the laboratory. The specific mutant NM2448 was studied by using linkage mapping in order to locate the mutation in the nucleotide sequence. The results indicated that the NM2448 mutant gene was not located on chromosomes 2 or 3 and further research must be conducted on the remaining 8 corn chromosomes to locate the senescence gene.

Location

Kinard 115

Start Date

4-16-2016 9:00 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 9:00 AM

Renewable Energy Sources; Locating The Nm2448 Mutant Gene For Senescence In Maize (Zea Mays L.) Cells To Lengthen The Lifespan Of The Crop For Use In Biofuels

Kinard 115

Senescence in Zea mays or maize plants is the programmed death of leaves and other organs that occurs at the end of a plant’s lifespan, seen in most plants during the autumn season. The goal of this project was to locate the genes controlling senescence in the leaves of maize in order to lengthen the crop’s lifespan and to allow plants to make more sugars through photosynthesis. The sugars in the grain or seed will be used as human and animal feed, while sugars in the leaves, stems, and other plant parts can be used for animal feed and as renewable energy sources. This project included fieldwork as well as laboratory work. The primary purpose of the fieldwork was to self-pollinate each corn plant and prevent contamination of the mutant corn plants’ genes. DNA of many mutant plants, that showed early senescence, was amplified through PCR reactions and then evaluated during gel electrophoresis in the laboratory. The specific mutant NM2448 was studied by using linkage mapping in order to locate the mutation in the nucleotide sequence. The results indicated that the NM2448 mutant gene was not located on chromosomes 2 or 3 and further research must be conducted on the remaining 8 corn chromosomes to locate the senescence gene.