Title

The Effects Of Nitrogen On The Phenolic Composition Of Japanese Knotweed

Author(s)

Marlin McKnight

School Name

Governor's School for Science and Math

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Botany

Presentation Type

Mentored

Mentor

Mentor: Dr. Tharayil; School of Agriculture, Forestry and Environmental Sciences, Clemson University

Written Paper Award

2nd Place

Abstract

The phenolic compounds found in soils and plants play an important role in nutrient usage and growth capabilities. Japanese knotweed (Fallopia japonica) is a species of plant that is native to Eastern Asia, Japan, China, and Korea; however, in the U.S and in several other countries, this plant species is classified as an invasive species due to its aggressive nature and its capability to overgrow indigenous plants. The rate at which Japanese knotweed grows can disrupt other plant species that surround it, mainly by taking over space and nutrients. Japanese Knotweed can cause damage to buildings, grow through weak spots in concrete, damage underground pipes and sewers, and even knock down boundaries such as fences. In order for us to understand how the plant is able to wreak havoc on the environment, we must analyze what is inside of the plant. The inner parts of the plant that we are concerned with are the Ester, Ether, and Lignin bonds that bind all the compounds that we need to analyze. We had three treatment groups: S (no nitrogen based fertilizer added), NS (Nitrogen based fertilizer added), and C (nothing touched). Adding fertilizer to a treatment group simulates what the plant will do in nutrient sufficient soil. By comparing and contrasting the data found in these groups, we could then understand the behaviors and properties of the plant. Understanding the plant would allow us to isolate the growth factor and eliminate it.

Location

Kinard 115

Start Date

4-16-2016 9:15 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 9:15 AM

The Effects Of Nitrogen On The Phenolic Composition Of Japanese Knotweed

Kinard 115

The phenolic compounds found in soils and plants play an important role in nutrient usage and growth capabilities. Japanese knotweed (Fallopia japonica) is a species of plant that is native to Eastern Asia, Japan, China, and Korea; however, in the U.S and in several other countries, this plant species is classified as an invasive species due to its aggressive nature and its capability to overgrow indigenous plants. The rate at which Japanese knotweed grows can disrupt other plant species that surround it, mainly by taking over space and nutrients. Japanese Knotweed can cause damage to buildings, grow through weak spots in concrete, damage underground pipes and sewers, and even knock down boundaries such as fences. In order for us to understand how the plant is able to wreak havoc on the environment, we must analyze what is inside of the plant. The inner parts of the plant that we are concerned with are the Ester, Ether, and Lignin bonds that bind all the compounds that we need to analyze. We had three treatment groups: S (no nitrogen based fertilizer added), NS (Nitrogen based fertilizer added), and C (nothing touched). Adding fertilizer to a treatment group simulates what the plant will do in nutrient sufficient soil. By comparing and contrasting the data found in these groups, we could then understand the behaviors and properties of the plant. Understanding the plant would allow us to isolate the growth factor and eliminate it.