Title

Mapping Of Genes Controlling Senescence In Maize (Zea Mays L.)

Author(s)

Alec Popichak

School Name

Governor's School for Science and Math

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Botany

Presentation Type

Mentored

Mentor

Mentor: Dr. Sekhon; Department of Genetics and Biochemistry, Clemson University

Abstract

The goal of this project was to use linkage mapping to locate the gene associated with senescence in maize. Senescence is a highly regulated process of cellular death in which as many resources are recycled as possible. It occurs naturally for a multitude of reasons but, after the grains mature in the maize plant, the leaves being to senesce. The mutagen ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) was added to maize in order to produce random nucleotide substitutions in the maize’s genome. Plants that showed early senescence were identified by visual screening. PCR was used to amplify the DNA of non-mutated and mutated plants and the results were visualized by gel electrophoresis. The mutants were then scored to determine their genetic makeup followed by linkage mapping to locate the mutated gene. The exact location of the gene was not identified but it was determined that it lies on maize's second chromosome.

Location

Kinard 115

Start Date

4-16-2016 9:30 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 9:30 AM

Mapping Of Genes Controlling Senescence In Maize (Zea Mays L.)

Kinard 115

The goal of this project was to use linkage mapping to locate the gene associated with senescence in maize. Senescence is a highly regulated process of cellular death in which as many resources are recycled as possible. It occurs naturally for a multitude of reasons but, after the grains mature in the maize plant, the leaves being to senesce. The mutagen ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) was added to maize in order to produce random nucleotide substitutions in the maize’s genome. Plants that showed early senescence were identified by visual screening. PCR was used to amplify the DNA of non-mutated and mutated plants and the results were visualized by gel electrophoresis. The mutants were then scored to determine their genetic makeup followed by linkage mapping to locate the mutated gene. The exact location of the gene was not identified but it was determined that it lies on maize's second chromosome.