Title

The Effect Of Ciprofloxacin On Escherichia Coli, Aquaspirillum Serpens, And Staphylococcus Epidermidis

Author(s)

Olivia Moran

School Name

Heathwood Hall Episcopal School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Microbiology

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Oral Presentation Award

2nd Place

Abstract

The purpose of this experiment is to attempt to induce bacterial resistance to Ciprofloxacin. Three different bacteria were put to the test as the independent variables: Escherichia coli, Aquaspirillum serpens, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. The dependent variable is the bacterial growth when exposed to Ciprofloxacin. The hypothesis is that if Escherichia coli, Aquaspirillum serpens, and Staphylococcus epidermidis are exposed to Ciprofloxacin, but not completely exterminated, they will all become resistant to the antibiotic. The null hypothesis is if Escherichia coli, Aquaspirillum serpens, and Staphylococcus epidermidis are exposed to Ciprofloxacin, but not completely exterminated, they will not become resistant to the antibiotic. Research was conducted, a procedure was established. Materials including Ciprofloxacin, Escherichia coli, Aquaspirillum serpens, and Staphylococcus epidermidis were purchased. First, Agar was made and poured into the petri dishes and left to set/cool. They were then refrigerated. When the bacteria arrived, a streaking method was first applied to culture the bacteria from slants. They were left to grow for 2-3 days. Next, the Ciprofloxacin was placed in the petri dishes. There were 18 dishes of each bacteria: 15 were exposed, and 3 were left to be the controls for each trial. The dishes were exposed for 48 hours. Pictures were taken, the antibiotic was then removed, and the next round of bacteria was cultured. This process was repeated for 2 additional trials, and then a new method of culturing was applied. A bacterial lawn made the zone of inhibition easier to observe. The experiment was yielding limited results so paper discs soaked in Clorox bleach were placed into the dishes to prove the antibiotic discs faulty. However, none of the bacteria died from the Clorox bleach, which leads us to proclaim this trial inconclusive.

Location

Owens 110

Start Date

4-16-2016 10:30 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 10:30 AM

The Effect Of Ciprofloxacin On Escherichia Coli, Aquaspirillum Serpens, And Staphylococcus Epidermidis

Owens 110

The purpose of this experiment is to attempt to induce bacterial resistance to Ciprofloxacin. Three different bacteria were put to the test as the independent variables: Escherichia coli, Aquaspirillum serpens, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. The dependent variable is the bacterial growth when exposed to Ciprofloxacin. The hypothesis is that if Escherichia coli, Aquaspirillum serpens, and Staphylococcus epidermidis are exposed to Ciprofloxacin, but not completely exterminated, they will all become resistant to the antibiotic. The null hypothesis is if Escherichia coli, Aquaspirillum serpens, and Staphylococcus epidermidis are exposed to Ciprofloxacin, but not completely exterminated, they will not become resistant to the antibiotic. Research was conducted, a procedure was established. Materials including Ciprofloxacin, Escherichia coli, Aquaspirillum serpens, and Staphylococcus epidermidis were purchased. First, Agar was made and poured into the petri dishes and left to set/cool. They were then refrigerated. When the bacteria arrived, a streaking method was first applied to culture the bacteria from slants. They were left to grow for 2-3 days. Next, the Ciprofloxacin was placed in the petri dishes. There were 18 dishes of each bacteria: 15 were exposed, and 3 were left to be the controls for each trial. The dishes were exposed for 48 hours. Pictures were taken, the antibiotic was then removed, and the next round of bacteria was cultured. This process was repeated for 2 additional trials, and then a new method of culturing was applied. A bacterial lawn made the zone of inhibition easier to observe. The experiment was yielding limited results so paper discs soaked in Clorox bleach were placed into the dishes to prove the antibiotic discs faulty. However, none of the bacteria died from the Clorox bleach, which leads us to proclaim this trial inconclusive.