Title

The Effect Of A Swimmer'S Orientation On Velocity In Underwater Kicking

Author(s)

Savannah Hillmeyer

School Name

Heathwood Hall Episcopal School

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Physiology and Health

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Oral Presentation Award

3rd Place

Abstract

The purpose of this experiment was to investigate the relationship between a swimmer’s orientation and velocity when dolphin kicking. Two underwater kicking styles were compared, underwater dolphins on back, and underwater dolphins on stomach. One of the largest uncertainties in the competitive swimming world is which type of underwater kick is fastest. Therefore, the results of this study could help clear the air of some of this controversy, by showing which type of kick is fastest for competitive swimming, especially in the freestyle events. The subjects used in this were asked to swim at least fifteen meters using their designated kick, and they were timed using stopwatches to measure how long it took them to kick fifteen meters of their designated kick. The hypothesis of this experiment was if a swimmer’s orientation is changed (on their back or on their stomach) when dolphin kicking, then they will have a greater velocity on their back than on their stomach. The results of this experiment supported the null hypothesis. In conclusion, this experiment will benefit the swimming community by displaying which orientation for underwater kick for freestyle has the greatest velocity.

Location

Owens G01

Start Date

4-16-2016 9:30 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 9:30 AM

The Effect Of A Swimmer'S Orientation On Velocity In Underwater Kicking

Owens G01

The purpose of this experiment was to investigate the relationship between a swimmer’s orientation and velocity when dolphin kicking. Two underwater kicking styles were compared, underwater dolphins on back, and underwater dolphins on stomach. One of the largest uncertainties in the competitive swimming world is which type of underwater kick is fastest. Therefore, the results of this study could help clear the air of some of this controversy, by showing which type of kick is fastest for competitive swimming, especially in the freestyle events. The subjects used in this were asked to swim at least fifteen meters using their designated kick, and they were timed using stopwatches to measure how long it took them to kick fifteen meters of their designated kick. The hypothesis of this experiment was if a swimmer’s orientation is changed (on their back or on their stomach) when dolphin kicking, then they will have a greater velocity on their back than on their stomach. The results of this experiment supported the null hypothesis. In conclusion, this experiment will benefit the swimming community by displaying which orientation for underwater kick for freestyle has the greatest velocity.