Title

The Effect Of Aerobic Exercise On Short Term Memory

Author(s)

Jaelen King

School Name

Heathwood Hall Episcopal School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Physiology and Health

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Oral Presentation Award

1st Place

Abstract

The purpose of this experiment was to measure the effect that aerobic exercise had on memory. The procedure was a fairly simple one. The subjects would first perform a baseline memory test, then complete 200 meters on the track at four increasing speeds. After each run, subjects would take the same online test. The results of the experiment were not statistically significant. While there was an average increase in the subjects’ score after each trial compared to the baseline, the subjects’ scores did not increase compared to the trial before them in every case. The varying scores were simply due to the subjects’ natural variation in memory. The aerobic exercise did not seem to change the subjects’ respective scores. It is assumed that the hippocampus was not given a long enough time to expand to significantly increase the subjects’ memory. Further testing where either the time interval after the run was completed but before the subject took the test was longer would be beneficial in seeing if a longer wait time would cause greater and more consistent memory growth. The results did not support the hypothesis that if the intensity of the exercise increased, then the subject’s memory would also increase.

Location

Owens G01

Start Date

4-16-2016 8:30 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 8:30 AM

The Effect Of Aerobic Exercise On Short Term Memory

Owens G01

The purpose of this experiment was to measure the effect that aerobic exercise had on memory. The procedure was a fairly simple one. The subjects would first perform a baseline memory test, then complete 200 meters on the track at four increasing speeds. After each run, subjects would take the same online test. The results of the experiment were not statistically significant. While there was an average increase in the subjects’ score after each trial compared to the baseline, the subjects’ scores did not increase compared to the trial before them in every case. The varying scores were simply due to the subjects’ natural variation in memory. The aerobic exercise did not seem to change the subjects’ respective scores. It is assumed that the hippocampus was not given a long enough time to expand to significantly increase the subjects’ memory. Further testing where either the time interval after the run was completed but before the subject took the test was longer would be beneficial in seeing if a longer wait time would cause greater and more consistent memory growth. The results did not support the hypothesis that if the intensity of the exercise increased, then the subject’s memory would also increase.