Title

The Effect Of An Anion Repelling Vibrating Cathode On The Amount Of Hydrogen Gas Produced In Water Electrolysis

Author(s)

Evan Johnson

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Engineering

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Oral Presentation Award

3rd Place

Abstract

Humanity’s dependence on fossil fuels and nonrenewable energy sources is a problem that needs to be faced for the continued existence of life on earth. The purpose of this experiment was to determine the effect of a vibrating cathode on H2 gas production during electrolysis, and to see what RPM level affected electrolyzer efficiency the most. An electrolyzer with no vibrating cathode was run for 30, 5 minute trials. 30 trials were then performed with a 11,000 RPM motor, 16,000 RPM motor and 20 were performed with a 30,000 RPM motor. The H2 gas production for no motor had M = 9.083 cm3 SD = 2.003 cm3. 11,000 RPM motor H2 gas production had M = 7.747 cm3 and SD = 0.914 cm3. 16,000 RPM motor H2 gas production had M = 7.803 cm3 and SD = 1.325 cm3. 30,000 RPM motor H2 gas production had M = 7.195 cm3 and SD = 0.831 cm3. The results found were statistically significant, as indicated by an ANOVA, F(3,110)=8.84, p<0.05), and Scheffe tests determined that significant differences lie between the no motor results and the 30,000 RPM results. The results did not support the hypothesis because the no motor trials showed significantly higher H2 gas production.

Location

Owens G08

Start Date

4-16-2016 10:30 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 10:30 AM

The Effect Of An Anion Repelling Vibrating Cathode On The Amount Of Hydrogen Gas Produced In Water Electrolysis

Owens G08

Humanity’s dependence on fossil fuels and nonrenewable energy sources is a problem that needs to be faced for the continued existence of life on earth. The purpose of this experiment was to determine the effect of a vibrating cathode on H2 gas production during electrolysis, and to see what RPM level affected electrolyzer efficiency the most. An electrolyzer with no vibrating cathode was run for 30, 5 minute trials. 30 trials were then performed with a 11,000 RPM motor, 16,000 RPM motor and 20 were performed with a 30,000 RPM motor. The H2 gas production for no motor had M = 9.083 cm3 SD = 2.003 cm3. 11,000 RPM motor H2 gas production had M = 7.747 cm3 and SD = 0.914 cm3. 16,000 RPM motor H2 gas production had M = 7.803 cm3 and SD = 1.325 cm3. 30,000 RPM motor H2 gas production had M = 7.195 cm3 and SD = 0.831 cm3. The results found were statistically significant, as indicated by an ANOVA, F(3,110)=8.84, p<0.05), and Scheffe tests determined that significant differences lie between the no motor results and the 30,000 RPM results. The results did not support the hypothesis because the no motor trials showed significantly higher H2 gas production.