Title

The Effect Of Cooking Oil On Pm2.5 Production

Author(s)

Treveon Myers

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Environmental Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Particulate matter (PM) is a small particle of airborne pollution that is the size of a microgram. Over the years, PM production has accumulated and has caused several health problems, which can range from mild bronchitis to death. One of the ways it is created is by cooking or burning foods. The purpose of the experiment was to show the effects of cooking oil on PM2.5 production, and which kind of cooking oil produces the least amount. It was hypothesized that canola oil would produce the least amount of PM2.5. The independent variables were the different types of cooking oils. Canola, corn, and safflower oil were used to fry ground beef in a frying pan for two minutes on an electric stove’s medium setting. The control was cooking with no oil. The data showed that the hypothesis was supported with canola oil producing the least amount of PM2.5, and the control of no oil producing the most. In order from greatest to least, no oil had a total of 18.8 micrograms, corn oil had a total of 14.1 micrograms, safflower oil made a total of 7.5 micrograms, and canola oil created an average of 4 micrograms of PM2.5. An ANOVA test was run to determine the significance of the means and a Tukey test was used to find the sources of variance between each mean. In conclusion, with respect to corn and safflower oil, canola oil had the least impact on the PM2.5 level.

Location

Owens 208

Start Date

4-16-2016 11:15 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 11:15 AM

The Effect Of Cooking Oil On Pm2.5 Production

Owens 208

Particulate matter (PM) is a small particle of airborne pollution that is the size of a microgram. Over the years, PM production has accumulated and has caused several health problems, which can range from mild bronchitis to death. One of the ways it is created is by cooking or burning foods. The purpose of the experiment was to show the effects of cooking oil on PM2.5 production, and which kind of cooking oil produces the least amount. It was hypothesized that canola oil would produce the least amount of PM2.5. The independent variables were the different types of cooking oils. Canola, corn, and safflower oil were used to fry ground beef in a frying pan for two minutes on an electric stove’s medium setting. The control was cooking with no oil. The data showed that the hypothesis was supported with canola oil producing the least amount of PM2.5, and the control of no oil producing the most. In order from greatest to least, no oil had a total of 18.8 micrograms, corn oil had a total of 14.1 micrograms, safflower oil made a total of 7.5 micrograms, and canola oil created an average of 4 micrograms of PM2.5. An ANOVA test was run to determine the significance of the means and a Tukey test was used to find the sources of variance between each mean. In conclusion, with respect to corn and safflower oil, canola oil had the least impact on the PM2.5 level.