Title

D-Limonene Derived From Orange Peels And Its Effects On Ethanol Production

Author(s)

Spencer O'Connor

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Environmental Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

The use of corn for ethanol production is a pertinent issue in the transportation and fuel industry as well as an issue for the economy and environment, being used in greater demand for ethanol production than for feedstock. A shift towards second generation biofuels, created using non food biomass, such as orange peels, is arguably a necessary change. This experiment was conducted to confirm ethanol production from orange peels, and it was hypothesized that undistilled orange peels that are fermented, would be capable of producing ethanol due to the essential oils present in the peels, specifically D-limonene. For the experiment, the undistilled orange peels were fermented along with distilled orange peels for comparison. Twelve bottles were used with orange peel powder (OPP) percentages of 5, 10, and 20 percent. It was found that fermented orange peels were capable of producing ethanol, measured in alcohol-by-volume (ABV), for all of the trials. The results more importantly showed that there was a difference between the ABV of the distilled and undistilled bottles of OPP and that the undistilled OPP bottles produced more ethanol. /

Location

Owens 210

Start Date

4-16-2016 10:30 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 10:30 AM

D-Limonene Derived From Orange Peels And Its Effects On Ethanol Production

Owens 210

The use of corn for ethanol production is a pertinent issue in the transportation and fuel industry as well as an issue for the economy and environment, being used in greater demand for ethanol production than for feedstock. A shift towards second generation biofuels, created using non food biomass, such as orange peels, is arguably a necessary change. This experiment was conducted to confirm ethanol production from orange peels, and it was hypothesized that undistilled orange peels that are fermented, would be capable of producing ethanol due to the essential oils present in the peels, specifically D-limonene. For the experiment, the undistilled orange peels were fermented along with distilled orange peels for comparison. Twelve bottles were used with orange peel powder (OPP) percentages of 5, 10, and 20 percent. It was found that fermented orange peels were capable of producing ethanol, measured in alcohol-by-volume (ABV), for all of the trials. The results more importantly showed that there was a difference between the ABV of the distilled and undistilled bottles of OPP and that the undistilled OPP bottles produced more ethanol. /