Title

The Effect Of A User'S First Programming Language On Their Ability To Program Overall

Author(s)

Preston Carlton

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Math and Computer Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Written Paper Award

2nd Place

Abstract

The purpose of this experiment was to determine whether or not a programmer’s first programming language had an effect on their interpretation of the language. It was hypothesized that the users learning Javascript would perform better on the final test than those that learned Ruby or Python. This was tested by using Codecademy.com to teach all of the 30 subjects the languages randomly assigned to them. After taking a few weeks to learn the languages, the subjects were then given a final test that was formatted the same but had different questions for each language. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) test was run at an alpha value of 0.05, and it was found that a user’s FPL did not have an effect on their ability to program. The p value (0.547) was greater than the alpha, thus suggesting there is no significant difference between the means. This greatly helps the computer programming world, because it tells us that there is no need to worry so much over what programming language someone learns first, as it has no significant effect on what they will be able to learn, or what is easier for them to learn.

Location

Owens 204

Start Date

4-16-2016 8:45 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 8:45 AM

The Effect Of A User'S First Programming Language On Their Ability To Program Overall

Owens 204

The purpose of this experiment was to determine whether or not a programmer’s first programming language had an effect on their interpretation of the language. It was hypothesized that the users learning Javascript would perform better on the final test than those that learned Ruby or Python. This was tested by using Codecademy.com to teach all of the 30 subjects the languages randomly assigned to them. After taking a few weeks to learn the languages, the subjects were then given a final test that was formatted the same but had different questions for each language. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) test was run at an alpha value of 0.05, and it was found that a user’s FPL did not have an effect on their ability to program. The p value (0.547) was greater than the alpha, thus suggesting there is no significant difference between the means. This greatly helps the computer programming world, because it tells us that there is no need to worry so much over what programming language someone learns first, as it has no significant effect on what they will be able to learn, or what is easier for them to learn.