Title

The Effect Of Paramecium Multimicronucleatum On Enterobacter Aerogenes Populations

Author(s)

Benjamin Wuori

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Microbiology

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

The purpose of this experiment was to determine if Paramecium multimicronucleatum could reduce the population of Enterobacter aerogenes should they contaminate a water source, as a means to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria. It was hypothesized that if P. multimicronucleatum were exposed to E. aerogenes, the Paramecia would reduce the bacterial population while increasing their own population. Petri dishes were filled with distilled water before having drops from a culture of Paramecia added to both groups, and additional drops from a broth solution with E. aerogenes were added to the experimental group. Random spaces on the petri dishes were examined for Paramecia counts and water from the dishes was spread on agar plates and incubated for 24 hours before being rated on a scale of 0-5 with zero being the lowest. A significant difference was found between the Paramecia experimental and control groups on day three, t(28.67)=119.883, p=.0003, and day seven, t(25.6)=183.44, p=6.17 x 10-7. This could be because the smaller bacterial population died off in the control trial, leaving less food. This supports the part of the hypothesis that states that Paramecia thrive with extra bacteria. Another t-test between the sixth and thirteenth days of the experimental bacteria counts shows a statistically significant drop between the days, t(14.7)=1.87119, p=.0034. However, descriptive statistics suggested that bacteria overcome Paramecia after about two weeks, despite the Paramecia seeming to exert some strain on the bacterial populations between days six and thirteen.

Location

Owens 110

Start Date

4-16-2016 1:45 PM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 1:45 PM

The Effect Of Paramecium Multimicronucleatum On Enterobacter Aerogenes Populations

Owens 110

The purpose of this experiment was to determine if Paramecium multimicronucleatum could reduce the population of Enterobacter aerogenes should they contaminate a water source, as a means to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria. It was hypothesized that if P. multimicronucleatum were exposed to E. aerogenes, the Paramecia would reduce the bacterial population while increasing their own population. Petri dishes were filled with distilled water before having drops from a culture of Paramecia added to both groups, and additional drops from a broth solution with E. aerogenes were added to the experimental group. Random spaces on the petri dishes were examined for Paramecia counts and water from the dishes was spread on agar plates and incubated for 24 hours before being rated on a scale of 0-5 with zero being the lowest. A significant difference was found between the Paramecia experimental and control groups on day three, t(28.67)=119.883, p=.0003, and day seven, t(25.6)=183.44, p=6.17 x 10-7. This could be because the smaller bacterial population died off in the control trial, leaving less food. This supports the part of the hypothesis that states that Paramecia thrive with extra bacteria. Another t-test between the sixth and thirteenth days of the experimental bacteria counts shows a statistically significant drop between the days, t(14.7)=1.87119, p=.0034. However, descriptive statistics suggested that bacteria overcome Paramecia after about two weeks, despite the Paramecia seeming to exert some strain on the bacterial populations between days six and thirteen.