Title

The Effect Of Inaudible High-Frequency Sounds Ranging From 20-100 Kilohertz On The Visual Accuracy Of Teenage Homo Sapiens.

Author(s)

Matthew Reupke

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Physiology and Health

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

This study was conducted in order to determine if inaudible high-frequencies have any effect on the human brain. A reaction was found to take place in the thalamus, which is the reception center for the senses of touch, taste, sight and sound. The hypothesis was that if teenage Homo sapiens listened to inaudible frequencies from 20 kilohertz to 22 kilohertz, then there would be greater visual inaccuracy at the 22 kilohertz frequency. The subjects were randomly assigned a number and tested individually. All participants complete a trial with no frequency that acted as the control. The first experimental trial used the twenty kilohertz inaudible frequency and the remaining frequencies were played in a random order. The ANOVA showed that F(6, 119)=1.578, p=0.159. The p-value was less than a=0.05, meaning that there was not a significant difference between the frequencies and the number of letters that were missed on the Snellen Chart. Each trial also included a color blindness test at each frequency. All participants passed the color blindness test for each frequency. Inaudible high-frequency sounds do not have an effect on the visual accuracy of a Homo sapien. /

Location

Owens G02

Start Date

4-16-2016 9:30 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 9:30 AM

The Effect Of Inaudible High-Frequency Sounds Ranging From 20-100 Kilohertz On The Visual Accuracy Of Teenage Homo Sapiens.

Owens G02

This study was conducted in order to determine if inaudible high-frequencies have any effect on the human brain. A reaction was found to take place in the thalamus, which is the reception center for the senses of touch, taste, sight and sound. The hypothesis was that if teenage Homo sapiens listened to inaudible frequencies from 20 kilohertz to 22 kilohertz, then there would be greater visual inaccuracy at the 22 kilohertz frequency. The subjects were randomly assigned a number and tested individually. All participants complete a trial with no frequency that acted as the control. The first experimental trial used the twenty kilohertz inaudible frequency and the remaining frequencies were played in a random order. The ANOVA showed that F(6, 119)=1.578, p=0.159. The p-value was less than a=0.05, meaning that there was not a significant difference between the frequencies and the number of letters that were missed on the Snellen Chart. Each trial also included a color blindness test at each frequency. All participants passed the color blindness test for each frequency. Inaudible high-frequency sounds do not have an effect on the visual accuracy of a Homo sapien. /