Title

The Effect Of Macular Pigment On Color Differentiation In Healthy Adolescents /

Author(s)

Allison Stanek

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Physiology and Health

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Written Paper Award

2nd Place

Abstract

The purpose of this experiment was to collect data on the Farnsworth-Munsell 100-Hue test (FM-100) scores of adolescent participants and to relate this information to their macular pigmentation. If the data supported a relationship, the goal was to use this relationship to quantify an exact correlation between FM-100 score and macular pigmentation value on the scale by Franssen et al. It was hypothesized that the group with the least macular pigmentation would score lowest on the FM-100 test. Test subjects had their irises scored on a scale from 0 to 25, with 0 being the lightest possible and 25 being the darkest possible. They were then given the FM-100 and their scores were examined in relation to their macular pigmentation scores. Test subjects were separated by gender due to the fact that women tend to have more accurate color vision than men. The male participants had a mean of 112.25, and the female participants had a mean of 94.5. The differences between average scores of macular pigmentation groups in male participants were found insignificant by ANOVA, F(5,23)=1.106, p>0.05. The differences between average scores of macular pigmentation groups in female participants were found insignificant by ANOVA, F(5,12)=1.379, p>0.05. These ANOVA values do not support the given hypothesis, meaning that significant error was likely to have taken place during experimentation. / /

Location

Owens G02

Start Date

4-16-2016 10:45 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 10:45 AM

The Effect Of Macular Pigment On Color Differentiation In Healthy Adolescents /

Owens G02

The purpose of this experiment was to collect data on the Farnsworth-Munsell 100-Hue test (FM-100) scores of adolescent participants and to relate this information to their macular pigmentation. If the data supported a relationship, the goal was to use this relationship to quantify an exact correlation between FM-100 score and macular pigmentation value on the scale by Franssen et al. It was hypothesized that the group with the least macular pigmentation would score lowest on the FM-100 test. Test subjects had their irises scored on a scale from 0 to 25, with 0 being the lightest possible and 25 being the darkest possible. They were then given the FM-100 and their scores were examined in relation to their macular pigmentation scores. Test subjects were separated by gender due to the fact that women tend to have more accurate color vision than men. The male participants had a mean of 112.25, and the female participants had a mean of 94.5. The differences between average scores of macular pigmentation groups in male participants were found insignificant by ANOVA, F(5,23)=1.106, p>0.05. The differences between average scores of macular pigmentation groups in female participants were found insignificant by ANOVA, F(5,12)=1.379, p>0.05. These ANOVA values do not support the given hypothesis, meaning that significant error was likely to have taken place during experimentation. / /